Results 1 to 2 of 2
  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Saudi Arabia
      • Current Location:
      • Saudi Arabia

    • Join Date: Aug 2012
    • Posts: 1,561
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    You were/have had dishonest with me and I can't rely on you.

    You asked your friend to drive you to hospital because you had an appointment, but he failed and broke his promise- slept until midday. Waking up and called you that he felt sorry. He will be honest with you the next day.


    Is it possible to say you were/have had dishonest with me and I can't rely on you. I had better find another one to give me a lift?



  2. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 18,886
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: You were/have had dishonest with me and I can't rely on you.

    This is not a matter of "honest" or "dishonest."

    Saying "I was at home last night" when he was out with your girlfriend is being dishonest. Dishonest is telling a lie or otherwise taking steps to make you think something that is untrue. It requires intention.

    Not keeping a promise is not "dishonest" - especially when it was not intentional.

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    You asked your friend to drive you to hospital because you had an appointment, but he failed and broke his promise- slept until midday. Waking up and called you that he felt sorry. He will be honest with you the next day. --> He won't let you down again.



    Is it possible to say you were/have had dishonest with me and I can't rely on you. I had better find another one to give me a lift?


    No. Even if he did lie to you (which is being dishonest) you would say "You were dishonest with me." You don't "have dishonest" - it's an adjective, not a verb.

    No, you failed to keep your promise. I'd better find someone else to give me a ride.

    ("Give me a lift" is okay too, but less formal than maybe a visit to the hospital requires.)

    Last edited by Barb_D; 24-Feb-2014 at 15:22.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] to rely heavily on something
    By salvador.dal1950 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 23-Dec-2013, 11:08
  2. Depend or rely
    By Freeguy in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 01-Dec-2013, 19:08
  3. [Grammar] rely / lean
    By Ashiuhto in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 06-Mar-2013, 07:42
  4. rely
    By azz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-May-2010, 01:15
  5. depend and rely
    By jiang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Apr-2008, 12:00

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •