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    #1

    go straight ahead vs go straight

    1. Go straight ahead
    2. Go straight

    When we are giving direction, is there a difference between the above phrases?

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: go straight ahead vs go straight

    I am not a teacher.

    Yes, there is a difference.

    "Go straight ahead" is a meaningful direction, easily understood relative to the starting position and the way the person (or vehicle) is facing.

    "Go straight" is incomplete. It leaves unanswered the question "in which direction?" If it were accompanied by hand waving or pointing it would probably be understood, but it lacks information.

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    #3

    Re: go straight ahead vs go straight

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    Yes, there is a difference.

    "Go straight ahead" is a meaningful direction, easily understood relative to the starting position and the way the person (or vehicle) is facing.

    "Go straight" is incomplete. It leaves unanswered the question "in which direction?" If it were accompanied by hand waving or pointing it would probably be understood, but it lacks information.
    Thanks Roman

    Are the following sentences natural?

    1. Go straight until the traffic light.
    2. When you get to the office block turn left and go straight. The restaurant is just there.

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    #4

    Re: go straight ahead vs go straight

    These sentences are fine and anyone would be able to find the restaurant following your directions.

    I would still add "on" or "ahead" after the word "straight" each time I used it, though.

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    #5
    Is "Go straight ahead" similar to "go straight forward"?

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    #6

    Re: go straight ahead vs go straight

    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    Is "Go straight ahead" similar to "go straight forward"?
    Could anybody help, please?

    Thanks.

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    #7

    Re: go straight ahead vs go straight

    I would understand 'Go straight forward' but I wouldn't say it.

    I'd say 'Go straight on'.

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