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  1. BrunaBC's Avatar
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    #1

    Either / Both

    Hello,

    Is there any difference between the two sentences below? I think they infer the same meaning.

    1 - Either option is feasible.

    2 - Both options are feasible.
    Not a teacher.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Either / Both

    I am not a teacher.

    You mean they imply, not infer, the same thing.

    In this case they do carry almost the same meaning.

    The very slight possible difference, depending on the context, is that 1. could mean either one option or the other is feasible (but not both) while 2. states that both are feasible.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Either / Both

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    You mean they imply, not infer, the same thing.

    In this case they do carry almost the same meaning.

    The very slight possible difference, depending on the context, is that 1. could mean either one option or the other is feasible (but not both) while 2. states that both are feasible.
    I can't think of a context in which "either option is feasible" means that only one of the options is feasible.

  4. Roman55's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Either / Both

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I can't think of a context in which "either option is feasible" means that only one of the options is feasible.

    Can't you? I can think of hundreds.

    Here's a simple example.

    I want to have some work done on my house and I have a budget of 5,000€. The kitchen project and the bathroom project will each cost around 4,500€. Either of these options is feasible.

    Now, I have a budget of 10,000€ and they both become feasible.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Either / Both

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    Can't you? I can think of hundreds.

    Here's a simple example.

    I want to have some work done on my house and I have a budget of 5,000€. The kitchen project and the bathroom project will each cost around 4,500€. Either of these options is feasible.

    Now, I have a budget of 10,000€ and they both become feasible.
    Just because you can't afford both does not make only one feasible. Both projects "could be done" and "are possible". But I get your point. Only one is affordable.

  6. Roman55's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Either / Both

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Just because you can't afford both does not make only one feasible. Both projects "could be done" and "are possible". But I get your point. Only one is affordable.
    I'm glad that you get my point, but you don't really accept it.

    In the first scenario I didn't say that only one was feasible, I said that either one was feasible. Once one of the options has been chosen the other one is no longer feasible, QED.

  7. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Either / Both

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    I'm glad that you get my point, but you don't really accept it.

    In the first scenario I didn't say that only one was feasible, I said that either one was feasible. Once one of the options has been chosen the other one is no longer feasible, QED.
    Yes, but before you counted your money both were feasible. Each could have been done. We basically see "feasible" differently. For you to say, one is "no longer feasible", you must have believed that it was feasible at one time. Hence, "no longer".

  8. 5jj's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Either / Both

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Yes, but before you counted your money both were feasible.
    I think that Roman's point was that both were not feasible.
    Each could have been done.
    Quite, but not both.
    For you to say, one is "no longer feasible", you must have believed that it was feasible at one time. Hence, "no longer".
    It was feasible only given that the other was not chosen.

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Either / Both

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I think that Roman's point was that both were not feasible.Quite, but not both. It was feasible only given that the other was not chosen.
    But his use of "no longer feasible" means that it had been feasible. "Feasible" deals with potential, not affordability or implementation. I get his point, but I disagree with it.

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    #10

    Re: Either / Both

    I AM NOT A TEACHER

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    You mean they imply, not infer, the same thing.

    In this case they do carry almost the same meaning.

    The very slight possible difference, depending on the context, is that 1. could mean either one option or the other is feasible (but not both) while 2. states that both are feasible.
    I found these 2 sentences in a dictionary, which support Roman55:

    1." You may sit at either end of the table", a person can not sit at both ends of a table at the same time.

    2. "There are trees on either side of the road", tress may be one of the sides, or on boths sides of the road.
    Last edited by Peter Chan; 24-Feb-2014 at 22:32. Reason: correct typing error

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