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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Lightbulb "Meander along...

    Hello,

    If I say: "He meanders along like an absent-minded professor strolling in a park.", it would mean that he is deviated.

    And if I say: "When it comes to taking decisions, he meanders along like an absent-minded professor strolling in a park.", it
    would mean that he lacks ideas, and is not able to decide what to do (ie he's totally confused).

    Please let me know the subtle difference between the two. That apart, I'm confused about the use of preposition "along" with "meander". Please enlighten me.

    Thank you for the eye-opener reply from your end.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Meander along...

    Quote Originally Posted by Pankaj Malik View Post
    Hello,

    If I say: "He meanders along like an absent-minded professor strolling in a park.", it would mean that he is deviated.

    And if I say: "When it comes to taking decisions, he meanders along like an absent-minded professor strolling in a park.", it
    would mean that he lacks ideas, and is not able to decide what to do (ie he's totally confused).

    Please let me know the subtle difference between the two. That apart, I'm confused about the use of preposition "along" with "meander". Please enlighten me.

    Thank you for the eye-opener reply from your end.
    What do you understand by the word "deviated"?

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: "Meander along...

    Sir,
    As far as I understand, "deviated" means "not concentrating on target" or "aberration from target". If otherwise, please enlighten me.

  4. Roman55's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Meander along...

    I am not a teacher.

    You are using the simile of "an absent-minded professor strolling in a park" to describe how he is meandering along. You are then interpreting the entire phrase as meaning that he is deviated. You mean he is deviating from his path.

    The result is rather comical since the poor man now sounds like a deviant rather than an absent-minded professor.

    It's all a bit long-winded and turgid I'm afraid.

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "Meander along...

    I don't think that use of "deviated" is natural. Perhaps you meant "distracted". In you sentence, "along" means onward, forward. It doesn't really add much to meaning.

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