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  1. vaibhavmaskar
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    #1

    Gerund or participial phrase

    1. He was sitting in a chair, reading a book. [participial phrase] or [Gerund Phrase]? "reading a book" can modify Subject "he", but book said, It's gerund phrase.

    2. we noticed our dog, barking unusually. [participial phrase] or [Gerund Phrase]?

    3. I sat in the shade of a tree reading a book. [participial phrase] or [Gerund Phrase]?

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    #2

    Re: Gerund or participial phrase

    You cannot keep giving your threads the same, unhelpful titles.

    A better title for this would have been Reading a book.

    Extract from the Posting Guidelines:

    'Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.'

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Gerund or participial phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by vaibhavmaskar View Post
    2. We noticed our dog, barking unusually.
    With the comma, your sentence means, "Barking unusually, we noticed our dog." It's possible, but you probably don't mean to use the comma. That is, you probably want the dog to be barking. Hence, you should write, "We noticed our dog barking unusually."

    Others can handle the gerund problems.
    Last edited by Raymott; 26-Feb-2014 at 13:32. Reason: To disambiguiate it, following Rover's post below.

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    #4

    Re: Gerund or participial phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "Barking unusually, we noticed our dog."
    To me, that sounds like you are barking.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Gerund or participial phrase

    In all three of those phrases, the -ing forms are participles. They are functioning adjectivally.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Gerund or participial phrase

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    To me, that sounds like you are barking.
    That's my point! That was a transposition of the OP's sentence, not a correction.
    Sorry if it was too subtle. I'll fix it.

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