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  1. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #1

    I feel bad / badly

    What's correct:

    "I feel bad" or "I feel badly".
    "I feel good" or "I feel well".

    I've been saying for entire my life "I feel bad / good", but I heard several times when people said "I feel badly / well". (Especially I heard it in sentences like "I feel badly for them")
    What's the difference between them?

    Thanks.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: I feel bad / badly

    I am not a teacher.

    "I feel well" means I am in good health. So does "I am well."
    "I feel good" means I am happy/positive/excited, etc...

    "I am good." is often heard in AmE to mean "I am well" but in BrE it means "I am a good person".

    "I feel bad" is the opposite of "I feel good".
    "I feel badly" should only be used when you really want to use the adverb "badly" to modify the transitive verb "feel".
    So you don't feel badly for people, you feel bad for them.

  3. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: I feel bad / badly

    I've a cold, I feel badly. Does it make any sense?
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: I feel bad / badly

    Not really. There you'd use the word ill (which, as a matter of etymological interest, used to be an adverb, like well). But today it's mostly an adjective. (The adverbial use exists in fossils like ill-considered, ill-mannered, ill-favoured [not very common, that one; it means ugly/bad-looking*], ...).

    b

    PS *....or unlucky or deformed, or all those things. It's a pretty versatile word
    Last edited by BobK; 26-Feb-2014 at 14:08. Reason: Added PS

  5. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: I feel bad / badly

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    What's correct:

    "I feel bad" or "I feel badly".
    "I feel good" or "I feel well".

    I've been saying for entire my life "I feel bad / good", but I heard several times when people said "I feel badly / well". (Especially I heard it in sentences like "I feel badly for them")
    What's the difference between them?

    Thanks.
    This an area that confuses many learners (and some NES). Verbs associated with the 5 senses can be linking verbs in some uses. When they are linking verbs, we use an adjective after them (not an adverb) because the adjective is a predicate adjective that describes the subject. In these cases, the verb can be replaced by a form of the word "to be".

    I feel hopeful (not hopefully) = I am hopeful.
    The roast smelled awful (not awfully) = The roast was awful.
    John's lasagna looked disgusting (not disgustingly) = John's lasagna was disgusting.
    The new piano sounds terrible (not terribly) = The new piano is terrible.
    The fruit salad tasted bad (not badly) = The fruit salad was bad.

    An example that I often use is "My dog smells bad" (He has a bad odor.) and "My dog smells badly" (He can't hunt because his nose doesn't work well.). Although the second sentence would not actually be used, it illustrates the point.

    You will hear people say "I feel badly". It is incorrect for the reasons given above. That would mean that there was something wrong with the sense of touch. But I suspect it will not go away.

    The other problem is the confusion with "good" and "well". The word "good" is an adjective, although you will run across it used informally as an adverb. (My mother never cooked this good.) The word "well" can be an adjective or an adverb. When it is used as an adjective, it usually means not ill or in good and proper order.

    This is why we can use "I feel good" (adjective - general positive feeling) and "I feel well" (adjective - not ill).

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