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  1. beachboy's Avatar
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    #1

    To head for

    "Where are you headed (for) this weekend?"
    Is it wrong/strange/uncommon to use the particle "for" in the sentence above?

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    #2

    Re: To head for

    Yes.

  2. beachboy's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: To head for

    As I see, the use of the particle is wrong, in this sentence, because it's redundant. So how do natives feel, for example, when they hear Diana Ross singing something like "Where are you going to?"? Is it acceptable because it's a song?

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    #4

    Re: To head for

    "Where are you going to?" or "where are you at?" are examples of normal speech. Purists might think them redundant, but you will hear this type of thing.

    "Where are you heading for?" is simply not common enough to be an expression. When you add "this weekend" it also reduces the tendency to tack an extra preposition on the end. When you add "this weekend" then "heading(for)" is no longer the end.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: To head for

    Quote Originally Posted by beachboy View Post
    As I see, the use of the particle is wrong, in this sentence, because it's redundant. So how do natives feel, for example, when they hear Diana Ross singing something like "Where are you going to?"? Is it acceptable because it's a song?
    People who write songs have to use words that can be easily rhymed. For obvious reasons that is more important to them than precise grammar.

    The line "Do you know where you're going to" is followed by a line ending with "you''.

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