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    #1

    Question " Doctor CAME me OFF The pill "

    Hi there,

    Can I use come me Off in this sentence? Or I just can use it when I myself decide to stop taking medicine.

    My doctor came me off the pills as they were causing some allergic rashes!


    Thanks.
    Last edited by Radman; 03-Mar-2014 at 18:27.

  1. Roman55's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: " Doctor CAME me OFF The pill "

    I am not a teacher.

    The doctor took you off the pills.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: " Doctor CAME me OFF The pill "

    I came off the pill five years ago.
    The doctor took me off the pill because of the risk of blood clots.

    I came off the pills last week.
    The took me off those pills last week because I don't need them any more.

    In BrE, the first two refer specifically to the contraceptive pill and the second two could refer to any unspecified prescribed tablets.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: " Doctor CAME me OFF The pill "

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    It may interest you to know that 'the pill' (mentioned in your title but not in your question), in BE at least, colloquially means specifically the contraceptive pill.
    That's true, but "The pill" only occurs in the title.
    The example sentence is "My doctor came me off the pills." "The pills" is commonly used for any pills.

    Originally, and still in some places, the 'Pill' is capitalised when it refers to the contraceptive pill.
    http://www.fpnsw.org.au/713867_8.html
    http://www.betterhealth.vic.gov.au/b...l_methods?open

    Bt this is falling out of fashion, so you're right that this needs to be considered when mentioning "the pill".

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    #5

    Re: " Doctor CAME me OFF The pill "

    Oops, I forgot to write " below' after sentences in the first line.
    And sorry I did not get your answer

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: " Doctor CAME me OFF The pill "

    "Come/came me off" is incorrect English.

    If you were advised by your doctor to stop taking the pills you had been taking, then it's "My doctor took me off the pills".
    If you decided yourself to stop taking the pills, then it's "I decided to stop taking the pills".
    If you said "I came off those pills", we would not know if it your doctor's advice or your decision.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: " Doctor CAME me OFF The pill "

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Come/came me off" is incorrect English.

    If you were advised by your doctor to stop taking the pills you had been taking, then it's "My doctor took me off the pills".
    If you decided yourself to stop taking the pills, then it's "I decided to stop taking the pills".
    If you said "I came off those pills", we would not know if it your doctor's advice or your decision.
    And if you've got a sympathetic doctor who knows you want to stop taking the pills, I'd add this:
    'My doctor helped me come off the pills' (this would be with a sort of medication that you had to taper off, instead of just stopping.)

    b

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