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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Synonyms for "as follows"

    Hello everyone,

    I frequently use the phrase "as follows" at the end of a paragraph to somehow open the next paragraph.
    For example:
    ----------------------------------------------------
    [First paragraph]...We detail this idea as follows.

    [Next paragraph] First, we ...
    ----------------------------------------------------

    Do we have any other phrases that can be used in this case?
    I try "in the following", but that phase does not sound good to me because I should add a noun after "following" such as "in the following paragraph", "in the following example", etc.

    CVang

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    #2
    Anyone helps?

  3. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #3
    Use "below".

    Not a teacher.
    Last edited by Matthew Wai; 12-Mar-2014 at 13:43.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by cavang View Post
    Can anyone helps ​help?
    As follows.
    As below.
    As shown below.
    As detailed below.
    Like this:
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  5. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #5
    Or "described below".

    Not a teacher.

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    #6
    Thank you very much!

  7. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    Or "described below".
    Only if something is described.

  8. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by cavang View Post
    I should add a noun after "following" such as "in the following paragraph"
    My Oxford dictionary reads "The following is a summary of events", in which no noun is after "following".

    Not a teacher.

  9. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Matthew Wai View Post
    My Oxford dictionary reads "The following is a summary of events", in which no noun is after "following".

    Not a teacher.
    There is a difference between "The following" (article + noun) and "In the following". Although it is possible to say "In the following, I will show you ...", it is much more likely that "following" would be considered an adjective and therefore would be followed by a noun, "In the following paragraph, I will show you".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  10. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by cavang View Post
    Thank you very much!
    Cavang, please note that you do not need to write a new post to say "Thank you" to anyone. Each post has a "Thank" button in the bottom left-hand corner. Click that button on any post you find useful. It saves time for everyone.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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