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    #1

    far from over

    Hello.
    over
    But the game was far from over and the home side were not going to go down without a fight.
    oxforddictionaries

    What part of speech is "over"? Is this an omiting, e.g. "far from being over", where "over" is adjective? Or this phrase is a set one and it's not clear what part of speech the 'over' is ?


  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: far from over

    Quote Originally Posted by Vik-Nik-Sor View Post
    Hello.
    over
    But the game was far from over and the home side were not going to go down without a fight.
    oxforddictionaries

    What part of speech is "over"? Is this an omiting, e.g. "far from being over", where "over" is adjective? Or this phrase is a set one and it's not clear what part of speech the 'over' is ?
    I my opinion "far from" is an adverb and "over" is a predicate adjective.

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    #3

    Re: far from over

    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    I my opinion "far from" is an adverb and "over" is a predicate adjective.
    I didn't expect such an answer...
    Why do you think so, could you explain?
    I think 'far' is an adjective here:
    far from
    in a degree, state, etc, remote from: he is far from happy.
    adj (prenominal)
    (thefreedictionary)

    Predicate adjectives follow such verbs like to be, become, smell, taste, etc...
    I would say 'over' here is an adverb, acting as a noun (because it's the object of the preposition "from")
    Am I wrong?
    Last edited by Vik-Nik-Sor; 08-Mar-2014 at 13:27.


  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: far from over

    'Over' in this sentence is, as Mike said, an adjective. Its meaning is close to that of finished, complete, past, at an end.

    'Far' is also an adjective and 'from' a preposition'. Together, as in your sentence, they function as an adverb modifying the adjective 'over'.

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