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    #1

    pronunciation of "I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary."

    How to pronounce the sentence "I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary."


    I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary.

    1. "t" of "don't" is no voice.
    2. "to" is pronounced /dɜ:/.
    3. "set down a" is pronounced "se town nə:", so d is no voice.
    4. "series of fact in a" is pronounced /ˈsɪri:zə/ + /fśktɪŋ/ + /nə:/ ,including 3 syllables. The "f" of the "of" don't voice.


    Am I right?
    Thanks a lot.



    "set down a series of fact in a" sounds like a word.

    Those pronunciation make me cry.

    Help me please!!

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: pronunciation of "I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary."

    Note first that it should be "a series of facts​".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: pronunciation of "I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary."

    Hello.
    First, I want to say that you need to pluralise 'fact' to 'facts'.
    Second, that there is not only one correct way to pronounce anything, so I can only advise you how I might say it as a native speaker, in a reasonably fast (but still clear), and connected way.

    1) Yes, the /t/ is not pronounced

    2) Like many people, I usually pronounce 'want to' as 'wanna' (wɒnə), but you could pronounce a /t/ sound followed by a schwa (wɒntə). Really not a /d/ with a long vowel as you suggest

    3) You're right that the /t/ and /d/ in 'set down' cannot both be pronounced, but you should skip the /t/ and say only the /d/. Not the other way round

    4) I don't think you've transcribed it very well. I pronounce it as six syllables, like: 'sɪərɪzə'fśksɪnə
    You can hear that the /v/ of 'of' disappears

    Hope that helps a bit!

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    #4

    Re: pronunciation of "I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary."

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    1) Yes, the /t/ is not pronounced
    It often isn't, but it can be.

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    #5

    Re: pronunciation of "I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary."

    Quote Originally Posted by jutfrank View Post
    3) You're right that the /t/ and /d/ in 'set down' cannot both be pronounced, b
    They can, and often are in careful, emphatic speech.

    Even in normal conversation, the /t/ is usually there; it's simply not exploded.The tongue makes a closure at the alveolar ridge, with the voice switched off. Then the tongue is released with a (partly) voiced /d/. If we were to utter 'set down' as /sedaʊn/ or ssetaʊn/, it would sound rather unnatural.

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    #6

    Re: pronunciation of "I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary."

    I disagree that they "usually are in careful, emphatic speech". Of course, it is possible to pronounce both in succession but this would have to be done very slowly. I can imagine, for example, an exasperated teacher saying "SIT DOWN!" in such a way.

    It doesn't, perhaps, make a lot of sense to say that the /t/ is there but simply not exploded. Doesn't that mean that it's not there (not pronounced) - that it has been assimilated? Sure, the tongue is in place, ready for the /d/, with the voice off but why do you say the /d/ is then only partly voiced?

    Yes, I think that we get a glottal stop in place of the assimilated /t/. Do you agree, and if so, how might you transcribe this?

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    #7

    Re: pronunciation of "I donít want to set down a series of fact in a diary."

    At the /t/ stage of 'set down', the tongue goes to the alveolar ridge to make a closure and, for a brief time, is not released. The same thing happens when a film director calls 'Cut!' The final /t/ is not exploded, but the tongue is in the positiion, and the vowel is both marginally different at the close and, more importntantly, is stopped. There is, to a phonetician, a difference between the /ʌ/ of/kʌ/ when it is followed by nothing, and the /ʌ/ of /kʌt/. The same is true of the /e/ of 'set down'.

    In 'set down' a spectogram will reveal that the initial part of the /d/ is unvoiced.

    You can probably hear the difference yourself. Say /sedaʊn/ as though it were written 'se-down', and then say /setdaʊn/ without exploding the /t/. In phonemic script I would write /setdaʊn/ - the unexploded /t/ is an allophone of /t/. In a slightly narrower transcription, I would write /sethdaʊn/.

    For some speakers there could be a glottal stop instead of a /t/, but I don't think this is common when followed by a /d/. In phonemic transcription, we could either consider this to be an allophone of /t/, and write it as /t/ or, in a slightly narrower transcription, use /
    ʔ/.

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