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  1. vaibhavmaskar
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    #1

    use of being

    1.Lisa is upset about clowns

    2.Lisa is upset about being a clown

    Which king of difference word "being" make here in these sentence? Is "being" use as a adjective here?
    Last edited by vaibhavmaskar; 10-Mar-2014 at 04:34.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: use of being

    1. We don't know what about clowns upsets Lisa. It's not a very natural sentence.

    2. Lisa *IS* a clown and doesn't like it.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. vaibhavmaskar
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    #3

    Re: use of being

    My confusing is about when we use word "being" as a gerund (noun) or adjective what kind of meaning it conveys?

    "Anonymous" suggest given link should be of some help also but it is not opening. could anyone give me the link to understand "being"

    [link removed]
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 10-Mar-2014 at 16:33. Reason: Link removed by mod - it went nowhere.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: use of being

    I don't understand what you are talking about, vaibhavmaskar. Only Barb has responded so far - we have no 'Anonymous" in this forum, and nobody has given any links.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: use of being

    When you use "being" with an adjective or a noun, it usually suggests a state that is temporary and/or new.

    You are stupid. -- You are permanently stupid.
    You are being stupid. -- You are acting in a way that a stupid person acts, even though you are not usually stupid.

    You are a nuisance. -- You are generally (usually) annoying.
    You are being a nuisance. -- Right now, your actions are annoying.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: use of being

    Hello, vaibhavmaskar.

    Lisa is upset [that she is a clown]. [that-clause]
    Lisa is upset [about being a clown]. [prepositional phrase] 'being' is a gerund.
    Lisa is upset [to be a clown]. [infinitive phrase]

    I am proud [that I am a teacher]. [that-clause]
    I am proud [of being a teacher]. [prepositional phrase] 'being' is a gerund.
    I am proud [to be a teacher]. [infinitive phrase]

    I can't think of an example of 'being' being an adjective. ('being' in bold is a gerund.)
    "Being" can be either a 'present participle' or a 'gerund'.

  7. vaibhavmaskar
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    #7



    Mister micawber (englishforums.com)

    The -ing form of the verb be has as a number of uses-- too many to go into detail here:

    1. Human beings are impatient creatures.
    2. I enjoy being a girl. (
    cf. I enjoy eating sandwiches)
    3. Are you being funny? (
    cf. You're acting crazy)
    4. Being human is not as good as being divine. (
    cf. Eating sandwiches is healthy)
    5. Being human, I am not divine. (
    cf. Carrying a pistol, I feel divine)
    6. There is little difference between Being and Nothingness.

    etc.


    In these given sentence Is there any use of "being " as a adjective?

  8. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by vaibhavmaskar View Post



    Mister micawber (englishforums.com)

    The -ing form of the verb be has as a number of uses-- too many to go into detail here:

    1. Human beings are impatient creatures."Human beings" is a noun.
    2. I enjoy being a girl. (cf. I enjoy eating sandwiches) gerund.
    3. Are you being funny? (cf. You're acting crazy) present participle
    4. Being human is not as good as being divine. (cf. Eating sandwiches is healthy) gerund
    5. Being human, I am not divine. (cf. Carrying a pistol, I feel divine) present participle
    6. There is little difference between Being and Nothingness. noun
    etc.


    In these given sentence Is there any use of "being " as a adjective? No, there isn't, in my opinion.

    Hello, vaibhavmaskar.
    Please see my comments above in blue.

  9. vaibhavmaskar
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    #9
    You said, being can be a present participle But present participle is also an adjective.

  10. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by vaibhavmaskar View Post
    You said, being can be a present participle But present participle is also an adjective.
    Hello, again.

    When a present/past participle modifies a noun/noun phrase, it functions as an adjective(, which I think is called a "participle/participial adjective"):
    http://grammar.yourdictionary.com/pa...adjective.html
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/le...rnitv325.shtml

    Unfortunately, however, "being" wouldn't work that way.

    (Edit)
    The boy [playing tennis over there] is Ken.

    In the sentence above, the present participle "playing" modifies the noun "the boy" and therefore it functions adjectivally.
    I wouldn't call it a "participle/participial adjective" - it would be just a present participle which functions adjectivally.
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 12-Mar-2014 at 13:52.

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