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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    "Thinking" in English

    Students often ask me how they can stop thinking in their native language and think in English. So many of them have told me that this prevents them from learning English. These students live and work with their native language; they do not use English until they arrive in the classroom.
    I have suggested they listen to the radio, watch TV and see movies in English to practice hearing and understanding the language.
    Also reading books with a Spanish/English, Polish/English, etc. dictionary and/or thesaurus in hand.
    What else can I do to help them?
    Thanks in advance!

  2. Newbie
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    #2

    Re: "Thinking" in English

    I think throwing more light on culture would be of great help to get them to think in English. To know how the English actually respond to some FAQ's asked at home or office or how do they excuse themselves to get their work done and so on... I think this will work a bit..

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: "Thinking" in English

    I like the idea of watching English movies, reading English newspapers and articles. This will improve their English skills, but they need to practice and apply it. I also suggest that when they are speaking in English, try to encourage them not to think in their native language. The reason is they are thinking in their native language and they will translate it to English and they will have grammar issues.

  4. Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    #4

    Re: "Thinking" in English

    Many learners try talking to themselves in the target language, which can help make it seem more natural.

  5. Newbie
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    #5

    Re: "Thinking" in English

    Itís a great way to learn English through watching movies, listening radio and reading.
    It would be really useful for your students not to use bilingual dictionaries.
    That way interference of their mother tongue would be minimal and it would strengthen their ability think in English. And recommend them to read books for young adults.These kind of books written in easy language. So usage of dictionaries would be minimal.
    I hope it was helpful.

  6. BobK's Avatar
    Harmless drudge
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    #6

    Re: "Thinking" in English

    Yes, monolingual dictionaries, used sparingly.

    I'm attaching a slide I did for a Portuguese class once. The message is the same for any language.

    b
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails ratiocinationPg.jpg  

  7. Newbie
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    #7

    Re: "Thinking" in English

    When I was learning German, in my 4th year of study I found myself naturally waking up thinking in German for at least a few minutes before I remembered I spoke English! That was really fun!

    I had a great teacher and she got us reading a book in German. We could choose the book from her small library of natural German books. Then we had to do a report on the book.
    That, and me listening to German songs and as much German speaking as I could find on the internet (when I had access) had my brain switching over.

    To this day, I stand by that method. Get your students reading normal English books. I'm trying to with mine but their English is still rather low, being middle schoolers. The reading and thinking might be a little more tied together in the human brain, although speaking is in an entirely different section. Regardless, it worked for me in my senior year of high school.

  8. SlickVic9000's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "Thinking" in English

    (Not a Teacher, but a Language Learner)

    Once your students have sufficient reading proficiency, I would promote the use of all English dictionaries. My experience is that entries in monolingual dictionaries tend to be much more nuanced and than bilingual dictionaries, which typically give very basic definitions. I remember when I first started using a monolingual dictionary in my second language. It was an "a-ha!" moment. It clearly explained not only the basic meaning of the word, but it's connotations, and it also provided example sentences.

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