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    #1

    walk past in place of walk through

    1. Jenny smiled, and they went for a long walk through the neighborhood

    2. Walk through the bridge, then you'll arrive the library.

    3. He walk through the streets and find a near - by park.

    Is it correct to use walk past in place of walk through in the above sentences?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2
    Only #1 is a correct sentence. Can you see why? (it has nothing to do with "through/past")

    Edit: You needn't answer my question now as others have shown you the answer.
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 11-Mar-2014 at 12:20.

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    #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Winwin2011 View Post
    1. Jenny smiled, and they went for a long walk through the neighborhood.
    "Walk past" does not work in this sentence.

    2. Walk through the bridge, then you'll arrive the library.
    "Walk past the bridge" and "walk through the bridge" do not mean the same thing. You also need to put "at" before "the library".

    3. He walk through the streets and find a near - by park.
    "He walks past the streets and finds a nearby park" does not make sense.

    Is it correct to use ‘walk past’ in place of ‘walk through’ in the above sentences?
    Please see my comments above. What do you think "walk past" means?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4
    No for 1 and 3. In addition, in #2, while we can walk past a bridge, we don't walk "through" bridges; we cross them or walk over them.

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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    No for 1 and 3. In addition, in #2, while we can walk past a bridge, we don't walk "through" bridges; we cross them or walk over them.
    We can also walk under them.

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    #6
    I am not a teacher.

    Perhaps the intended meaning in #2 is to walk under the bridge, rather than over it.

    EDIT: cross-posted.

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    #7
    And I somehow completely missed that "walk through the bridge" was not possible. In my head, it said "tunnel"!
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #8
    1. He walked past the beautiful garden where he used to play in his childhood. (Does it mean that he was outside the garden?)

    2. He walked through the beautiful garden where he used to play in his childhood. (Does it mean that he was inside the garden?)

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    #9
    Yes and yes.

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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    Yes and yes.
    Thanks, Mike.

    1. When I walked through the Queen's Road, I saw a traffic accident.

    2. When I walked past the Queen's Road, I saw a traffic accident.

    Which of the above sentences is correct?

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