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    #1

    'For now'

    Hey there,

    The phrase ' for now' means until later as I learned. Just want to make sure my understanding is correct. Here is the example I have. For now I will give you my text. It means I won't give the text to you until later on
    not now.

    Thanks,

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2
    Who told you that "for now" means "until later"?
    Your example uses "for now" incorrectly.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3
    "For now" means "this is true right now, but it might not be true later."

    You live in an area experiencing flooding. You say to your worried mother, who is calling you from a long way away, "For now, we are safe, but don't worry - if anything changes, we will evacuate."

    ("until later" may not be grammatical either - If you had written "Until later I will give you my text" that would not be correct. "I will give you my essay later.")
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #4
    Not a teacher.

    I think we can replace "for now" with "until a later time". For example: Goodbye for now. Am I right?
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 12-Mar-2014 at 22:58. Reason: Adding 'Not a teacher'.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #5
    No native speaker would say 'Goodbye until a later time'.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6
    We don't say "Goodbye until a later time" although it's understandable why speakers of other European languages might logically think that we do.

    "Au revoir. A la prochaine" (French) = Goodbye. Until the next time.
    Adios. Hasta la proxima (Spanish) = Goodbye. Until the next time.
    Adios. Hasta luego (Spanish) = Goodbye. See you later. (Literally "until then").

    After "goodbye", we use a variety of phrases:

    See you later.
    See you soon.
    See you tomorrow/tonight/Monday.
    Later! (a much more recent addition)
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #7
    An even more recent addition: Laters.

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