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    #1

    at day break

    off
    Eventually, Frank and his comrades anchored three miles off the French coast at day break.
    oxforddictionaries

    Hello.
    I haven't seen in dictionaries "day break" as a noun. Only with "break" being a verb.
    Is this an idiomatic use?


  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2
    "Daybreak", usually one word, means the beginning of the day, when the sun comes up, the dawn.

  2. probus's Avatar
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    #3
    Check out "daybreak", a compound or agglomerative word.

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