Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jan 2014
    • Posts: 67
    #1

    Why do we say "a highly international holiday"

    Why do we say "a highly international holiday" and not "a high international holiday" ?

  1. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,309
    #2
    I am not a teacher.

    Because you are using the word to modify "international" and not "holiday" so you require an adverb.

    The sentence itself seems a bit strange but there is no such thing as a high holiday. "Highly international" means "very international".

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #3
    I have not come across the expression 'a highly international holiday'. When I read the question 'Why do we say "a highly international holiday ...?', my first reaction was to respond 'We don't'.

  3. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #4
    Judaism has "High Holidays", specifically Yom Kippur and Rosh Hashanah. However, I would not describe them as "high international holidays". I would consider "international High Holidays" since Judaism crosses all borders, but that would not be common. I agree with 5jj's thoughts about "highly international holiday".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,475
    #5
    Kharkhun, why do you think we say 'a highly international holiday'?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jan 2014
    • Posts: 67
    #6
    I just read this sentence in Facebook.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,832
    #7
    Was it written by a native speaker? What was the whole sentence?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Persian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • Iran

    • Join Date: Jan 2014
    • Posts: 67
    #8
    The original sentences is: (Written in Voxy Page on Facebook)

    Mardi Gras is a highly international holiday. Some of the other major celebrations take place in Germany (as "Karneval"), Italy (as "Martedi Grasso"), Trinidad (as "J'Ouvert"), and Mexico (as "Martes de Carnaval")."

    And yes. The writers are native speakers.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,832
    #9
    In my opinion, that's a poor use of the word "highly". I would have written something like "Mardi Gras is a holiday/festival which is celebrated internationally" or "Mardi Gras is an internationally-celebrated holiday/festival".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  6. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #10
    I don't think I'd use 'highly intenational' at all, but I don't object to it in the way it's used in these sentences. It would even just about work if I read "Mardi Gras is a highly international festival in Rio. Tens of thousands of vistors from all over the world flock to the city for the event" However, in the sense of it being celebrated all over the world, I'd go for ems's suggestions or say that it is 'a truly international holiday'.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. "Self-praise is international disgrace."
    By kohyoongliat in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 24-Jan-2014, 14:28
  2. to a special holiday camp or without "a"
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Nov-2010, 14:28
  3. Replies: 0
    Last Post: 25-May-2010, 14:33
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 29-Mar-2010, 14:40
  5. Unable to access "International café"
    By Hortence in forum Support Area
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 22-May-2009, 12:52

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •