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  1. Junior Member
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    #1

    Tie up the dog

    Can I say "I tie up the dog", when I use collar and chain to restrin the dog from running arbitrarily inside the house.

    Does it sound like I tie up the dog's four leges making it unable to walk?
    Last edited by bigC; 14-Mar-2014 at 10:27.

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    #2
    Quote Originally Posted by bigC View Post
    Can I say "I tie up the dog", when I use collar and chain to restrain the dog from running arbitrarily inside the house. Yes.

    Does it sound like I tie up the dog's four legs making it unable to walk? No.
    Rover

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #3
    "Tie up" or "chain" the dog would be understood correctly. But that would not normally be done "inside" the house. If I heard of that, I would notify the local SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals).

  3. Junior Member
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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    "Tie up" or "chain" the dog would be understood correctly. But that would not normally be done "inside" the house. If I heard of that, I would notify the local SPCA (Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals).
    I am happy to learn you are also a dog lover.

    I will do that only when someone who is afraid of dogs comes to my house.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #5
    If that happens, put the dog in another room and close the door. Problem solved. If the dog is friendly and not aggressive, use the opportunity to "train" your friend.

  5. Junior Member
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    If that happens, put the dog in another room and close the door. Problem solved. If the dog is friendly and not aggressive, use the opportunity to "train" your friend.
    Some people are connately afraid of dogs.

    My dogs are used to being tied up for several hours, the chains are long, they still have some movement in their area.

  6. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #7
    You have no doors?

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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by bigC View Post
    Some people are connately afraid of dogs.
    I learned a new word today, bigC: 'connately'.

    It's interesting that you know that word; 'innately' is much more common.

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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    I learned a new word today, bigC: 'connately'.

    It's interesting that you know that word; 'innately' is much more common.
    I assumed that was a mistake!

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    #10
    So did I. We are not alone - it's mentioned in very few dictionaries here: http://onelook.com/?ls=b&fc=all_gen&q=connately

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