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    #1

    as time passes

    Hi,

    1) As time passes, I get older and older.

    I’ve just learned to say “as time passes”. I was to taught to say “as time goes by”. Do they mean the very same? Can I use it whenever I want or is it “foreign” English?

    2) And when she passes, each one she passes goes - ah...

    That's what the song Girl from Ipanema says. I wonder how would a native speaker say this sentence, please. "To pass" doesn't seem to be a genuine English verb that is commonly used by native speakers.

    Thanks

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2
    "As time passes" is functionally equivalent to "as time goes by".

    The lyrics from "Girl from Ipanema" are understandable to native speakers. She is passing in front of people on the beach.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3
    I am not a teacher.

    1) Yes, they mean the same. "As time goes by" is much more common. "As time passes" has a slightly more literary or poetic feel to it.

    2) I would say "And when she passes by, each one she passes goes…"

    To pass is both transitive and intransitive, so it has many uses. It is a genuine English verb even though it does come from old French and Latin.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4
    'Pass' is a perfectly natural English vernb. I don't know where you got the idea that it wasn't from.

    Incidentally, there are 151 COCA citations for 'as time goes by' and 141 for 'as time passes', so they appear to be equally common.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    It is a genuine English verb even though it does come from old French and Latin.
    As do about 60% of all our words.

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    #6
    Thanks.
    If I’m driving my car, but there is another car ahead of me travelling slowly and I want to PASS(?) it so I can get to my destination in time, what is the right verb to use, please?
    Thanks again.

  5. Roman55's Avatar
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    #7
    I am not a teacher.

    In BrE we use "overtake".

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    #8
    And In America, it is called "passing." You pass a line of cars on the freeway. There are "no passing zones" on many roads.

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