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    #1

    "for me" and "to me"

    Hi,I would like to know the difference between "for me" and "to me"!!thank you!

  1. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #2
    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

    We need examples. You can say "Can you explain it to me" and "It sounds odd for me" (by the way, "to me" is correct here as well, but it's not natural I think). When you write sentences we will tell you the difference.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #3

    "to me" and "for me"

    Quote Originally Posted by Boris Tatarenko View Post
    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

    We need examples. You can say "Can you explain it to me" and "It sounds odd for me" (by the way, "to me" is correct here as well, but it's not natural I think). When you write sentences we will tell you the difference.

    Thanks for your answer!!I have no examples,I just wanted to know if there is a specific grammatical rule about it!!I hope you'll get what you desire!!

  2. Roman55's Avatar
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    #4
    I am not a teacher.

    In many cases it is the same difference as exists between "for" and "to".

    An idea just came to me…

    I'm out of here, the police are coming for me!

    If you're thinking of when we say something like,
    "For me, the difference is minimal." or,
    "To me, they have the same meaning." then I would say that the difference is minimal and they have more or less the same meaning.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Miryam85 View Post
    Thanks for your answer! I have no examples,I just wanted to know if there is a specific grammatical rule about it! I hope you'll get what you desire!
    In that case, you have not received an answer. Boris has told you what the situation is for just one sentence. We didn't expect you to have example sentences ready but we are suggesting that you now think of some so that we can see how you use "to me" and "for me". Then we can tell you if you are using them correctly.

    Please note that we only put one appropriate punctuation mark at the end of a sentence and that we leave a space after a full stop, comma, question mark or exclamation mark.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6
    Prepositions are used in so many different ways that it is difficult to give a credible ‘core’ meaning for each that will answer an apparently simple question such as yours. Howeverm if you look at the first two definitions here, http://www.macmillandictionary.com/d...y/american/for, ansd the first four here, http://www.macmillandictionary.com/d...ry/american/to you will get a good idea of the difference between these two prepositions.

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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Miryam85 View Post
    Thanks for your answer. I have no examples, I just wanted to know if there is a specific grammatical rule about it. I hope you get what you desire.
    I see no need for any exclamation marks there, Miryam—let alone six.

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    #8
    Thanks for your suggestions, I'm here to improve my English skills!

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #9
    So have you thought of any example sentences yet, Miryam85?
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Miryam85 View Post
    Thanks for your suggestions. I'm here to improve my English skills​. !
    You need a full stop after 'suggestions'. Your second sentence is a statement not an exclamation.

    Click here to read about usage of the exclamation mark.

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