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  1. Newbie
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      • Native Language:
      • Spanish
      • Home Country:
      • Mexico
      • Current Location:
      • Mexico

    • Join Date: Mar 2014
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    Where to find?

    Dear teacher,

    I hope you are doing well, this is my first time surfing this amazing webpage and I came across an English structured I seldom use because Im an Sapanish speaker, however I want to become a good English student.

    Can you walk me through and tell me where I can find info about the adjectives ending "ful and less" its a little Greek to me.

    Please advise.

    Oscar

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Nov 2002
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    #2
    In general, "ful" means "full of" and "less" means without.

    meaningful = full of meaning
    remorseful = full of remorse
    sorrowful = full of sorrow

    penniless = without money
    loveless = without love
    humorless = without humor

    Those suffixes do not fit with every adjective, however.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 15-Mar-2014 at 09:24.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Mar 2007
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    #3
    Welcome to the forums.
    Not all words can take these endings.

    When you see a word that ends in "ful" it means that the thing being described is "full" of the root word - there is a lot of the root word.
    Bountiful harvest -- full of 'bounty' [ good things that are given or provided freely and in large amounts - www.m-w.com] -- a big harvest
    A successful career -- a career full of success

    When you see a word that ends in "less" it means there is none of the root word present.
    A groundless accusation -- an accusation without any grounds [a basis for belief, action, or argument - www.m-w.com ]
    A paperless office -- an all-electronic office without paper
    Last edited by Barb_D; 15-Mar-2014 at 13:20.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. tzfujimino's Avatar
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      • Japanese
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      • Japan
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      • Japan

    • Join Date: Dec 2007
    • Posts: 2,697
    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    A groundless accusation -- an accusation without any grounds [a basis for belief, action, or argument - www.m-w.com ]


    @oavila
    Thank you for the nice expression. I've just learned a new thing:
    Can you walk me through [...] (walk somebody through something)
    (My eyes nearly popped out of my head when I first read the sentence.)

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