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    #1

    [a potter]'s vessel or a [potter's vessel]?

    Young's Literal Translation
    Thou dost rule them with a sceptre of iron,
    As a vessel of a potter Thou dost crush them.
    ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    You shall break them with a rod of iron and dash them in pieces like a potter's vessel.
    Which analysis is correct: [a potter]'s vessel or a [potter's vessel]?
    Last edited by sitifan; 15-Mar-2014 at 06:06.
    I need native speakers' help.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2
    I think very few people would make a distinction. As far as I know, there is no specific thing called a "potter's vessel" (see link). I'm pretty sure it just means the type of vessel that a potter would make. That is, I'd say your first choice is correct.
    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=%...w=1366&bih=643

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    #3
    I agree with Ray that few would make a distinction. I don't think that it has ever occurred to me to make it.

    Now that the question has been raised, I think Ray's analysis seems logical. I tries to think of examples of a [noun's X]. There are probabably many, but the only two I have come up with so far are a Jew's harp and a Webb's Wonder, a variety of lettuce.

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    #4
    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    There are probably many ...
    I think there are probably many more than we can think of right now. Here are just two from medicine:
    “Housemaid's knee” = prepatella bursitis.
    “Golfer's elbow” = medial epicondylitis.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 15-Mar-2014 at 10:10. Reason: minor typo

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    #5
    In medicine, there are probably hundreds: Whipples's triad, Cushing's disease, Marie's disease, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, etc., to name a few.

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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeNewYork View Post
    In medicine, there are probably hundreds: Whipples's triad, Cushing's disease, Marie's disease, Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia, etc., to name a few.
    True. I was trying to keep proper names out of it. That would be too easy. It would allow "Schubert's Serenade", "Pascal's Wager", "Homer's Iliad", etc. because these all refer to a specific thing rather than to any wager made by Pascal, or any serenade written by Schubert. It would also rule out Webb's Wonder.

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    #7
    "John can be a dog's name."


    "I read a Guide to Family Health."
    "I read a [People's Guide] to Family Health." I don't think "I read [a People]'s Guide to Family Health." would work.

    (I hope I'm not talking nonsense.)
    Last edited by tzfujimino; 15-Mar-2014 at 14:25.

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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It would also rule out Webb's Wonder.
    I don't think it would. Webb's Wonder is the name of variety of lettuce, just like iceberg. You can buy a Webb's Wonder in a way that you can't buy a Schubert's serenade. In the other things you mentioned, we fo have the idea of a(n) X composed/written/etc by Y. I don't think many people who have anything to do with lettuce think of a horticulturalist called Webb when they refer to this variety.

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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I don't think many people who have anything to do with lettuce think of a horticulturalist called Webb when they refer to this variety.
    Sure, and people with Hodgkin's Disease don't spend much time thinking about Thomas Hodgkin. That doesn't make the term any less eponymous. You are right about Schubert, etc. I should have thought of better examples (though I think you can make a Pascal's wager). But it all depends on the rules of the game. If eponyms are not allowed, then "Webb's Wonder" is out. If they are allowed, it's too easy.

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