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    #1

    SINCE or FROM?

    Dear teachers and members:


    I would like to know if SINCE can be used with TODAY as in the following sentence.

    1) I have been playing football since today.

    2) Since today, I have been playing football.

    I think that SINCE as preposition cannot be used with TODAY, I think that in these cases FROM may be used.


    I ask for your help and assistance in this matter
    Last edited by The apprentice; 17-Mar-2014 at 04:08.

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2
    Neither is very natural to me. In a sitation like this, I'd be far more likely to say something like "I started playing football only today" or "This is my first day of playing football".

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    #3
    Thank you 5jj:


    Is is possible to use SINCE with TODAY?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4
    I can't think of a likely situation for this, as 'since' is followed by the past time at which a situation extending to the present started.

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    #5
    I totally agree with you 5jj, by the way, what does 5JJ mean?, ha, haa, haaa.

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    #6
    Perhaps he has 4 older brothers named jj.

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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    what does 5JJ mean?
    It's an abbreviated form of my original username, fivejedjon, which is made up of three names by which I am known in that weird world that appears to exist outside my office.

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    #8
    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    Is it possible to use 'since' with 'today'?
    No, but at 10am you can say 'I've had a headache since seven o'clock', and in the evening you can say 'I haven't eaten since this morning'.

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    #9
    Thank you Rover-KE, I think I got you.


    SINCE means from a definite past time untill now, so it is not supposed to be used with a present time like TODAY.

    a) From 7 o'clock to 10 a.m. has been a particular period of past time untill now (7 o'clock / 10:00 a.m.).

    b) From the morning to the evening has been another past time untill now (the morning / the evening).

    According to what I just learned, SINCE as well as TODAY must be used with PERFECT TENSES.

    Very interesting your explanation.


    *ANOTHER QUESTION TO ALL OF YOU:

    Can FROM be used in the above case?

    1) I have been playing football from today.

    Must be ON added to the above sentece?

    2) I have been playing football from today on.
    Last edited by The apprentice; 17-Mar-2014 at 04:19.

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    #10
    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post

    Can 'from' be used in the following sentence?

    1) I have been playing football from today. No. It doesn't make sense.

    Must be 'on' be added to the following sentence?

    2) I have been playing football from today on. that doesn't make sense either.
    Please note that 1 is not used in English to number a sentence.

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