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    #1

    Coloquial and standard sentences

    Do you confirm the accuracy of this picture? (From both viewpoints)

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  1. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #2
    Hello, kharkhun.

    It's illegible, I'm afraid.
    (And it's 'colloquial', by the way.)

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    #3
    How can I make it larger for you?

  2. tzfujimino's Avatar
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    #4
    I have no idea. I'm sorry.
    (Should I try a magnifying glass? No, I don't think it will work.)

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    #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Kharkhun View Post
    How can I make it larger for you?
    Type out one or two examples for a start.

    There seems to be too much material there to consider all at once.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6
    I've managed to make out a few:

    Colloquial: The car works real good.
    Standard: The car works well.

    Colloquial: What for?
    Standard: Why are you leaving?

    Colloquial: We're in a bind.
    Standard: We're in trouble.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  4. 5jj's Avatar
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    #7
    Based on that very small sample, my opinion is that this colloquial/standard list is not very helpful. I'd say:

    The car works real good. Unnatural and/or substandard in BrE.
    The car works well. Not very natural in BrE. Cars tend to 'run' rather than 'work'.

    What for? It's 'colloquial' in that it's not a complete sentence, It's also possible only if somebody has stated their intention of doing something before. It does not, on its own, mean 'Why are you leaving?'.
    Why are you leaving? That's standard enough.

    We're in a bind. That's one informal thing that could be said.
    We're in trouble. OK

  5. Roman55's Avatar
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    #8
    I am not a teacher.

    The thumbnail directs us to a very difficult-to-read list of dubious quality.

    The word colloquial is spelt in two different ways within the space of 5 words.

    The "coloquial" list contains 21 phrases and the standard list contains only 20. It's the supposed equivalent of "What for?" that's missing, which might explain the problem 5jj pointed out.

    Numerous clues indicate that the expressions are AmE. "in a bind", "that much of a…", "pal around", "The Knicks" etc…

    Plus there is the use of adjectives as adverbs e.g. "real good" (twice) and "awful thirsty".

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    #9
    "The car runs good" is not colloquial, it's wrong.

    Do people use incorrect English? All the time.

    But that doesn't make it an "informal" or "colloquial" way of saying it. Just sub-standard and indicative of someone who doesn't know better or who doesn't care.

    If you type out more of these so we can see them (I blew it up (colloquially) or enlarged it (formally) and the words were too fuzzy to read.)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. anhnha's Avatar
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    #10
    ***NOT A TEACHER***

    If I am not mistaken, that is an excerpt from Grammar Essentials: Learn to Express Yourself Clearly & Correctly.

    Colloquial Standard
    The car works real good. The car works well.
    Ben got sick of waiting. Ben tired of waiting.
    I’m awful thirsty
    I’m very (or quite or extremely) thirsty.
    It looks like they’ll be late.
    It looks as if (or as though) they’ll be late.
    The cake was real good. The cake was very (or quite) good.
    We’re in a bind. We’re in trouble.
    Drew put it off till tomorrow. Drew postponed it until tomorrow.
    I don’t have that much of a chance. I don’t have a very good chance.
    Rosa got there in time. Rosa arrived in time.
    Jill got the order. Jill received the order.
    I like to pal around with her. I like to spend time with her.
    Kip got the wrong idea across. Kip conveyed the wrong idea.
    I just don’t get it. I just don’t understand.
    How come you’re leaving? Why are you leaving?
    What for? Why?
    I see where you’re coming from. I understand your point.
    Leah had one of those days. Leah had a difficult day.
    Rodney can’t make up his mind. Rodney can’t decide.
    Robin will keep an eye on things. Robin will watch things.
    They’re going to live it up tonight. They’re going to celebrate tonight.
    The Knicks pulled it off. The Knicks succeeded.


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