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  1. Newbie
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    #1

    Post JK Rowling is good who are you to insult her.

    JK Rowling is good who are you to insult her.


    What does the
    above sentence mean? I can't possibly understand this sentence.
    Thank you in advance.




  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    It would make more sense as two sentences. "JK Rowling is good. Who are you to insult her?"
    Last edited by bhaisahab; 17-Mar-2014 at 11:03.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3
    I am not a teacher.

    The problem is the punctuation.
    It is said by someone who likes J.K.Rowling and is coming to her defence.

    J.K.Rowling is good; who are you to insult her? or,
    J.K.Rowling is good! Who are you to insult her?

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4
    First, it is bad sentence because it is a run-on sentence. There are two independent clauses with no connection or separation.

    J.K. Rowling is good. Who are you to insult her?

    The sentences express criticism of someone who criticized the author.

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    #5
    Welcome to the forums, Joe.

    In what context did you encounter this sentence?

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