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    #1

    From monday to friday OR From monday through friday.

    Dear teachers and members:


    I have always had a confusion regarding the following phrases.

    I°) I work from monday to friday.

    II°) I work from monday through friday.


    a) I know the first phrase is the one used the most and I also think it may mean one of the followings:

    1) I work from monday to friday, except on thursday.

    2) I work from monday to friday (I don't work on tuesday, wednesday or thursday).


    b) In the second phrase I think the followings:

    1) I work from monday through friday (When using THROUGH, I cannot omit any day from monday to friday).

    2) I work from monday through friday (I work on monday, tuesday, wednesday, thursday and friday).


    QUESTION:

    Which one is more formal?

    Please, help me in this issue, I would like to have my doubt cleared up. Not only is this a confusion to me, but to others as well.
    Last edited by The apprentice; 17-Mar-2014 at 17:47. Reason: Add something else

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    #2
    "Monday to Friday" would include all of the days inbetween (i.e. Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday). In most cases (e.g. "I work Monday to Friday") it is understood to include Friday as well.

    "Monday through Friday" is explicit in including Friday.

    If someone says "pick a number from 1 to 10" this would normally include "10." Saying "through" just makes it explicit.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3
    Please note that the days of the week are capitalized.

    If you work Monday to Friday, you work Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, and Friday. You work all five of those days.

    If you work Monday AND Friday, you do not work Tuesday, Wednesday, or Thursday.

    "Monday to Friday" is the common way to say it. It's not more or less formal than "Monday through Friday" and has the same meaning.

    When you say "Monday through Friday," I expect to hear something about Saturday and/or Sunday.

    Mondays through Fridays, we are open 9 am to 7 pm. Saturdays and Sundays, we are open 10 am to 5 pm.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4
    In BrE, we use only '(from) Monday to Friday' for this five-day period. In all varieties of English we use an initial capital letter for days of the week.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 17-Mar-2014 at 18:28. Reason: tiny typo

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    #5
    Thank you to all of you for your help and cooperation.


    In more than a decade studying English on my own, it's the first time I learn weekdays must be capitalized in all varieties of English; does it happen the same with months?

    NOTE: I forgot to ask you the next question in regards to the above sentences.


    It seems to me that those phrases are prepositional phrases, aren't they?
    Last edited by The apprentice; 17-Mar-2014 at 20:35.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6
    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    In more than a decade studying English on my own, it's the first time I learn weekdays must be capitalized in all varieties of English; does it happen the same with months? Yes, do you not read? To me that's like learning Spanish for 10 years and not noticing that you put question marks in front of a question as well as at the end. I'd suggest opening any book in English (preferably a novel or a non-fiction book unrelated to grammar, flick through it and notice which words are capitalised. (Or search a computerised book for capitals). I'll note here that it would take about half an hour for anyone to do this with punctuation as well.
    It seems to me that those phrases are prepositional phrases, aren't they?
    Yes, they are prepositional phrases.
    Last edited by Raymott; 18-Mar-2014 at 00:40. Reason: Fix abysmal error: comma to question mark.

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    #7
    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    ...weekdays must be capitalized in all varieties of English; does it happen the same with months?
    Yes, it does.

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    #8
    Thanks Raymontt for replying:


    In my one than a decade English self-study, I have read a lot in English but I have never observed this, even though I love grammar and writing either in English as in Spanish. Actually I'm studying phonetics as well as phonology on my own, and I still reconize that I need to learn lots of grammar and writing issues; I constantly work on that, especially by analyzing the issue and by asking questions about.

    I would appreciate you to recommend me a book about knowing to use puntuation marks and when to capitalize words; it will help me significantly in my writing.

    NOTE: In Spanish a comma (.) is not put neither at the beginning nor at the end of a question; an interrogation mark (?) is put instead.

    I'm a native Spanish speaker from Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.


    Regards.
    Last edited by The apprentice; 22-Mar-2014 at 02:47.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9
    Quote Originally Posted by The apprentice View Post
    I would appreciate you to recommend me a book about knowing to use puntuations; it will help me significantly in my writing.
    In Spanish a comma (.) is not put neither at the beginning nor at the end of a question; an interrogation mark (?) is put instead.
    Oops, that was a mistake. I don't now how I made it. I've fixed it.
    Thanks, apprentice, for pointing our my 'thinko' (which I'll call it).
    Actually, your punctuation isn't bad. I was speaking generally in that sentence. My point was that you don't need a special book telling you how to punctutate (or capitalise). You just need to open a novel, and read it - while taking notice of interesting aspects of the language. Esta es una de las maneras que estudio Espaņol. I'm sure there are plenty of punctuation sites on the web, but I wasn't suggesting that you needed them.

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