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    #1

    Question 'A and B alike' as a subject

    When 'A and B alike' is a subject, do we regard it as a unit or two separate units?
    Thanks a lot!

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    #2
    That depends on context. Do you have any?

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    #3

    Re: 'A and B alike' as a subject

    As a subject, I would generally use a plural verb.

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    #4

    Re: 'A and B alike' as a subject

    As far as I can work out, you can only use "alike" with two or more items, so it has to be plural. "Alike" doesn't unify the items.

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    #5

    Re: 'A and B alike' as a subject

    Then I say, "A and B alike are both good choices."
    The use of both is proper, right?

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    #6

    Re: 'A and B alike' as a subject

    I am not a teacher.

    "A and B alike are both good choices." sounds like overkill to me.

    "Both" is good, it's "alike" that doesn't work.

    I think you mean, "A and B are both good choices." or, " "A and B are equally good choices."

    To use "alike" adverbially you would have to turn the sentence around to something clumsy like, "The [quality of being a good choice] applied to A and B alike."

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