Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #1

    impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    "Washington, D.C. – U.S. Senator John McCain (R-AZ) released the following statement on the need to provide greater support to Ukraine and impose additional costs on Russia in the wake of the Russian government’s annexation of Crimea today:"

    Is "to impose costs" equivalent in meaning to "to impose sanctions"? If not, would there be a difference in meaning?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    "Sanctions" often refers to punishments over and above adding "costs". I think "sanctions" would be a better word than "costs" in this use.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,833
    #3

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    The last of the measures, which aims to make US fuel exports more available to reduce European dependency, might be seen as a kind of cost rather than a sanction as it will reduce their revenues but not by blocking or banning things:
    http://www.mccain.senate.gov/public/...ain-on-ukraine

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,833
    #4

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    I heard President Obama use the word costs on the news last night, so it seems to the word of choice. Maybe they're using it to sound tougher somehow than sanctions- more action and less bureaucratic. I don't recall the word being used this way much before now.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #5

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    For me, "sanctions" sounds tougher than "costs".

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • Laos

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 57,833
    #6

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    It does seem to be a deliberate and recent choice, though, so they're doing it for a reason.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,309
    #7

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    I am not a teacher.

    "Sanctions" is a far broader term and also sounds more aggresive while remaining vague.
    "Costs" at least gets right to the point, money!

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #8

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    My impression is that "sanctions" are direct actions commanded by governments.

    "Costs" are a broader thing. As mentioned above, if the US gov't encourages the production and export of LNG to Europe in order to lessen Russia's hold on natural gas supply there, that is not a "sanction." It is a policy that will impose costs on Russia.

    Some liquor stores in the US and Canada are refusing to stock Russian vodkas. This is not a sanction, but it is a cost to Russia's economy.

  4. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,309
    #9

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Some liquor stores in the US and Canada are refusing to stock Russian vodkas. This is not a sanction, but it is a cost to Russia's economy.
    I am not a teacher.

    Oh, you mean like arbitrarily boycotting French produce and manufactured goods when France didn't feel inclined to invade Iraq?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,307
    #10

    Re: impose sanctions vs Impose costs

    Quote Originally Posted by Roman55 View Post
    I am not a teacher.

    Oh, you mean like arbitrarily boycotting French produce and manufactured goods when France didn't feel inclined to invade Iraq?
    Yes, similar to that. I think the major impact was the temporary re-naming of French fries as "freedom fries" in some places.

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. [General] impose on people for favors
    By Silverobama in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 08-Jun-2012, 04:57
  2. impose a ban what's informal for
    By ostap77 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Feb-2011, 17:29
  3. impose
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 12-Sep-2008, 18:03
  4. impose on versus impose for
    By Shibuya in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 20-Feb-2008, 01:43

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •