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  1. dodonaomik's Avatar
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    #1

    in(?) between

    In metalwork one advantage of adhesive-bonding over spot-welding is that the contact, and hence the bonding,
    is effected continuously over a broad surface rather than at a series of regularly spaced points with no bonding in between.



    I can understand between (the spaced points), but I cannot understand in, so I want to know
    what function the word in has.



    Sincere thanks!!!

  2. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in(?) between

    http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/de...ween?q=between see the "ADVERB" part.

    Not a teacher.

  3. dodonaomik's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: in(?) between

    But the word I can't understand is just in but not between.

  4. Matthew Wai's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in(?) between

    In your sentence, "in between" = "between", see http://www.ldoceonline.com/dictionary/between

    Not a teacher.

  5. Roman55's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: in(?) between

    I am not a teacher.

    "In between" is a way of saying "between" without having to repeat the object.

    "...a series of regularly spaced points with no bonding between." wouldn't be good English.

    You can say it correctly in the following two ways.
    "...a series of regularly spaced points with no bonding between them." or,
    "...a series of regularly spaced points with no bonding in between."

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