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    #1

    guests young and old vs. young and old guests

    I came across the following sentence in an Americannewspaper.

    "Guests young and old ended up loving the fun socks they were given at theparty."

    Does it make any difference if they say "young and old guests"instead of "guests young and old?"



  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: guests young and old vs. young and old guests

    No, not really. But I prefer the original.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: guests young and old vs. young and old guests

    Yes, it makes a difference. This use of "young and old" is an idiom meaning "everyone, every age".
    But if only "young and old guests" liked the socks, maybe the middle-aged guests didn't - since this doesn't carry the wider idiomatic meaning.

  3. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: guests young and old vs. young and old guests

    It's not 'old and new' that's the idiom in my opinion; it's noun, adjective and antonym' as in "Inside the exhibition hall, there is a trade show of Cerdedo tastes, old and new", one of several examples I found here.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: guests young and old vs. young and old guests

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    It's not 'old and new' that's the idiom in my opinion;
    Alright, it's "guests, young and old" that is the idiom. The reason I didn't state it that way was that "guests" is not an integral part, ie. it's "<nouns>, [both] young and old" that is the idiom. I suppose you agree that "Young and old <nouns>" doesn't measure up.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: guests young and old vs. young and old guests

    I agree that "Young and old <nouns>" doesn't measure up.

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