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    #1

    In order to and that

    Hi guys,

    Which one is correct?

    1 "He swiped his card in order to get his friend out of the station"

    2 "He swiped his card in order to make sure that his friend came out of the station"

    If both sentences are corrrct then why did we use past form after in order to in the second sentence, is it because we divided the second sentence in 2 parts using "make sure and that"? Please explain.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: In order to and that

    Good question. That's why sticklers for prescriptive grammar would say 2 was 'wrong', and 'should' be
    Code:
    He swiped his card in order to make sure that his friend might come out of the station.
    But a lot of people would regard that as stilted and hoity-toity.


  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: In order to and that

    Quote Originally Posted by tufguy View Post
    If both sentences are corrrct then why did we use past form after in order to in the second sentence, is it because we divided the second sentence in 2 parts using "make sure and that"? Please explain.
    I see it differently from Bob. The verb after "in order to" in 2. is 'make' - a present tense verb. The sentences are both in the past tense - "He swiped ..." The reason that a past tense verb 'came' is in the second sentence, but not the first, is that both sentences are in the past tense, and the first sentence is constructed such that there is no verb in that construction. So, you haven't provided comparative sentences, and there is no anomaly.
    Put into the present tense, we have:
    1. "He swipes his card in order to get his friend out of the station."
    2. "He swipes his card in order to make sure that his friend comes out of the station."
    So, there's no contradiction in the present tense form either.

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    #4

    Re: In order to and that

    I'd say "He swiped his card to get his friend out of the station".

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: In order to and that

    ... or 'to let his friend out'. (The verb 'get' sounds to me a bit urgent.)

    b

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