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    #1

    singular verb and plural verb

    Hi,
    I have been confused about singular verbs and plural verbs. Would you please help me to understand it correctly?
    Eg: have, has, is, are, cut, cuts etc. From these verbs, which are single verbs and which are plural verbs called?

    Thanks.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: singular verb and plural verb

    kite, this is very basic English.
    You need to know the forms of "to be" "to have" and "to do" thoroughly.
    I am
    You are
    He is
    We are
    You are
    They are

    I have
    You have
    She has
    We have
    You have
    They have

    I do
    You do
    It does
    We do
    You do
    They do

    With regular verbs, the third person singular has an S. The rest do not.

    I, you, we, they cut
    He cuts

    I, you, we, they sneeze
    She sneeze

    I, you, we, they yell
    He yells

    And so on.

    Don't try to learn any more about tenses until you understand this backwards and forwards.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #3

    Re: singular verb and plural verb

    Thanks Barb. Sorry for being late. I know every part you wrote here. I actually wanted to know just their names. I mean names of the verbs or how they should be called. Let's take it easily. If a verb that takes "s", is it called singular verb; eg: leaves, goes, eats? and if a verb that does not take "s", is it called plural verb; leave, go, eat? This is how I have understood in this case.

    Thanks.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: singular verb and plural verb

    It all depends on "person". Verbs that tale an "s" are third person singular (he, she it). Other verbs that don't take an "s" are also singular (I, singular "you". Plural "person" verbs do not take an "s" (we, plural you, they".

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: singular verb and plural verb

    You will cause yourself a lot of confusion if you call all the other forms "the plural form."

    As Mike says, it's the "third-person singular" form that has the S. You MUST includes person as well. Just calling it "singular" is not accurate.

    First person: I (singular) We (plural)
    Second person: You (singular or plural)
    Third person: He, she, it (singular) They (plural)
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: singular verb and plural verb

    Lets see if I got it. I (singular) eat (singular verb) banana. She (singular) sings (singular verb) songs. They (plural) play (plural verb) football. Do you (singular) support (singular verb) them? Do you (plural) guys like (plural verb) beer? How about now? Did I understand the case properly? It depends on the person, right? If the person singular, the verb is also named as singular verb, right? and if the person is plural, the verb is plural too, right?

  4. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: singular verb and plural verb

    As I said above, you must include person for this to be meaningful.

    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    Lets see if I got it.
    I (first-person singular) eat (first-person singular verb) [a] banana.
    She (third-person singular) sings (third-person singular verb) songs.
    They (third-person plural) play (third-personplural verb) football.
    All okay until here.


    Here the verb that changes is "to do," not the main verb, which is in the bare infinitive form (which means the "to X" without the "to")
    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    Do (second-person singular) you (second-person singular) support (bare infinitive) them?
    Do (second-person plural) you (second-person plural) guys like (bare infinitive) beer?
    Does (third-person singular) he (third-person singular) understand this?

    Except for our irregular verbs, the third-person singular is the only one that will look different, with the S.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: singular verb and plural verb

    Quote Originally Posted by kite View Post
    It depends on the person, right? If the person singular, the verb is also named as singular verb, right? and if the person is plural, the verb is plural too, right?
    Yes, if you want to define verbs that way. In English we don't. When I went to school, there was no such thing as singular or plural verbs. I'm not sure whether that has changed in places. A verb form corresponds to the subject in both number and person. "Cut" is neither a singular nor a plural verb. "I (singular) cut", "We (plural) cut". It's the same. You might choose to call 'cut' singular when it's used with 'I' and plural when it's used with 'We'. But that's tautologial - it adds nothing, and that's probably why native speakers are not taught to use the terms "singular verb" and "plural verb". Verb forms don't have number: some forms are always singular ('am, cuts'), but none (that I can think of) are always plural. I agree with the others that you'd do better not trying to look at verbs this way.
    What you've written is true: if a subject is singular you use a "singular verb form", but that doesn't tell you what that form is. You need to learn the (relatively simple in English) conjugations.
    In Hindi, you can say that 'hai' is singular and 'hain' is plural, but in English, 'are, have' can be either singular or plural depending on the subject - it's different.
    http://www.geocities.ws/lordvaruna/

    (Crossed with BarbD)

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