Results 1 to 9 of 9
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 599
    #1

    Question "lower than 25 degrees out"

    Hello,

    The following sentence is from a news story about a young couple who built a 128 sq ft tiny house for $10,000.

    One of their biggest challenges was figuring out how to endure Rhode Island's brutally cold winters in such a small structure. They use a small 400-watt electric heater for above-freezing temperatures and switch to a mini propane heater when it's lower than 25 degrees out.

    Does 'lower than 25 degrees out' mean 'minus 25 degrees'? Usually, I read '25 below zero' or something similar. I had not read '25 degrees out' before.

    Thank you

  1. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,134
    #2

    Re: "lower than 25 degrees out"

    No. It means below 25 degrees Fahrenheit, which is about minus four degrees Celsius. 'Out' here means 'outdoors'.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 599
    #3

    Re: "lower than 25 degrees out"

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    No. It means below 25 degrees Fahrenheit, which is about minus four degrees Celsius. 'Out' here means 'outdoors'.
    @5jj, thank you. It would have been easier for me if it had just said 'lower than 25 degrees outside/outdoors'.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 41,876
    #4

    Re: "lower than 25 degrees out"

    It would be easier for all learners if all English was written with easily recognised words and no slang/colloquialisms and alternative phrases were used.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

  3. Amigos4's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Oct 2007
    • Posts: 54,914
    #5

    Re: "lower than 25 degrees out"

    Typically, Americans would not end this sentence with the word 'out'. We would use the word 'outside".
    "...when it's
    lower than 25 degrees out." sounds Canadian to me.

    What is the source for your news story?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Apr 2009
    • Posts: 12,310
    #6

    Re: "lower than 25 degrees out"

    It doesn't sound that odd to me.

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #7

    Re: "lower than 25 degrees out"

    "Out" doesn't sound unusual to this AmE speaker.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Aug 2008
    • Posts: 599
    #8

    Re: "lower than 25 degrees out"

    Quote Originally Posted by Amigos4 View Post
    Typically, Americans would not end this sentence with the word 'out'. We would use the word 'outside".
    "...when it's
    lower than 25 degrees out." sounds Canadian to me.

    What is the source for your news story?
    Sorry for the late reply. The new story appeared on Yahoo Finance (the link is in my original post). I don't have any other information which might offer a clue regarding a Canadian connection.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Mar 2007
    • Posts: 19,221
    #9

    Re: "lower than 25 degrees out"

    As two Americans have pointed out, it's totally natural to say "it's X degrees out."
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: 15-Jul-2013, 18:38
  2. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2012, 04:23
  3. [Vocabulary] How to better rephrase "it costs lower by 10%"
    By Ellena in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Feb-2011, 22:42
  4. "lower the front of the dress"
    By imchongjun in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 18-Feb-2008, 11:47
  5. confusing words "expressed" or "express" and "named" or"names"
    By Dawood Usmani in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 26-Oct-2007, 19:33

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •