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    #1

    in the throes of

    But they say it is the hope that kills you and as United were still in the throes of celebration, their lead had lasted just 22 seconds and suddenly a game was on.

    The above is what I hear on TV. But I doubt whether the underlined collocation is right. So I confirm with you teachers.

    Is "in the throes of" collocated with "celebrations"? If YES, what does it mean in this context?

    Thanks

    Jason

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in the throes of

    It is a very odd word to use for celebration. It usually means "pain", "anguish", "a difficult period". "In the throes of passion" can be used for having sex. "Throes" can mean "spasms" and perhaps the author was describing the celebration as some mass spasm, but that is a stretch.

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    #3

    Re: in the throes of

    I believe they scored a goal and then while still feeling happy saw one scored against them just seconds later, so the writer might mean that the celebrations turned to pain. It's a strange phrase, though.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: in the throes of

    I have met some people in my life who, based on the common phrase "in the throes of a dilemma", thought that "throes" meant "midst" or "middle". This seems to be the way the word was used here.

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    #5

    Re: in the throes of

    In the UK, we have a special term for sports commentators' language use: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Colemanballs

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