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    #1

    Joe's dog has got a thick fur

    When we talk about animals do we treat "fur" as a countable noun or an uncountable noun?
    I've found in a book:
    A bear has got a thick fur.
    And in the same book:
    Joe's dog has got thick fur.

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    #2

    Re: Joe's dog has got a thick fur

    A dog has fur. They are only countable once the animal is dead and the fur has been removed. Then, you might be a trapper who has for sale many furs.

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    #3

    Re: Joe's dog has got a thick fur

    Quote Originally Posted by angelene001 View Post
    I've found in a book:
    A bear has got a thick fur.
    It might be possible in a wider context of comparing the bear's fur to other animals, but in most contexts this wouldn't work.

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    #4

    Re: Joe's dog has got a thick fur

    In this book, there's a unit about animals. One exercise says:"Which animal has got?". And then there are several things enlisted: a tail, wings, scales, a fur. It's a course book for children.

    I'm trying to find a reason why there is "a fur".
    It doesn't seem to match the context of comparing each animal's fur. And it's definitely about living animals, not dead ones.

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    #5

    Re: Joe's dog has got a thick fur

    In that example, 'a fur' is a mistake.

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    #6

    Re: Joe's dog has got a thick fur

    "Which animal has got?" is not a proper English question in a quiz. I assume the author isn't native English, so you'll probably encounter other errors. I'd write the question as "Which animal has got ... ", then list the alternatives.

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    #7

    Re: Joe's dog has got a thick fur

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    "Which animal has got?" is not a proper English question in a quiz. I assume the author isn't native English, so you'll probably encounter other errors. I'd write the question as "Which animal has got ... ", then list the alternatives.
    Unfortunately, it was my mistake.

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