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  1. nininaz's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    Hi Dear Teachers,
    we know adjective clauseshave several parts: a relative pronoun ,a subject,and a predicate (a verb and, often, other types of words which follow it).
    But why in In the following sentence the subject is omitted ?Is the relative pronoun (that) the subject of the following adjective clause ?

    "The National Film Board of Canada was established in 1939 toproduce films that reflect Canadian life and thought."
    Thanks

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post

    "The National Film Board of Canada was established in 1939 toproduce films that reflect Canadian life and thought."
    Thanks
    What subject is missing? Where did you get that definition? (Really).
    "That" refers to "films". The films reflect Canadian life and thought.
    Adjective clauses don't repeat the subject (in this case, 'films'). If they did, they wouldn't need a relative pronoun.

  3. nininaz's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    Thanks for reply, We know adjective clauses have several parts: a relative pronoun ,a subject,and a predicate.
    In the sentence "films" is the "object "of the main sentence,"that" is "relative pronoun","reflect Canadian life and thought" is "adjective clause", reflect is "verb" and according to the necessary parts of adjective clause( a relative pronoun ,a subject,and a predicate) which part of sentence is subject?

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    I'm asking where you got "We know adjective clauses have several parts: a relative pronoun ,a subject,and a predicate" from.
    A relative pronoun is a pronoun that relates to a noun. In this case, that noun is 'films'. It's the object of the first clause and, by reference, the subject of the relative clause.

  5. nininaz's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    Reference: http://www.eslcafe.com/grammar/adjective_clauses01.html
    and http://www.grammar-monster.com/glossary/adjective_clauses.htm

    The Components of an Adjective Clause

    An adjective clause (which can also be called an adjectival clause or a relative clause) will have the following three traits:
    It will start with a relative pronoun (who, whom, whose, that, or which) or a relative adverb (when, where, or why).

    • (This links it to the noun it is modifying.)(Note: Quite often, the relative pronoun can be omitted. However, with an adjective clause, it is always possible to put one in. There is more on this below.)
    • It will have a subject and a verb.(These are what make it a clause.)
    • It will tell us something about the noun.
      (This is why it is a kind of adjective.)

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    OK, from your first link,
    "Subject Pattern" Clauses "In this type of adjective clause, the relative pronoun is thesubjectof the clause."
    From your second link: "Quite often, the relative pronoun is the subject of the clause"

    That means that "that" is the subject. It's fine from a syntactic point of view to call "that" the subject. Semantically, if you want to understand the sentence, the subject is "films", which is referred to by "that".
    Whether you call 'that' or 'films' the subject of the clause depends on what system you're taught.

  7. nininaz's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    O.K , Thanks.
    Actually in the first post I asked you: 'that' is the subject of adjective clause or not ? :)

  8. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    Quote Originally Posted by nininaz View Post
    Actually in the first post I asked you: 'that' is the subject of adjective clause or not ? :)
    Yes, sorry for confusing you. When I was taught grammar, "films" would have been referred to as the subject.

  9. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    A relative clause can have a relative pronoun + a subject + a predicate, or it can have a relative pronoun that is the subject + a predicate. When the relative pronoun is the subject of the clause, it cannot be omitted. When the relative pronoun is not the subject of the clause, it usually can be omitted. Raymott was correct about a difference between semantics and syntax, but when we are parsing sentences, we are primarily interested in syntax.

    These are the cakes that I made. (relative pronoun + subject + predicate)
    These are the cakes I made. (relative pronoun omitted because it is not the subject)

    In the original sentence, the relative pronoun cannot be omitted because it acts as the subject of the clause.
    Last edited by MikeNewYork; 15-Apr-2014 at 10:36. Reason: typo

  10. nininaz's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: Adjective Clause (why subject is omitted?)

    No, That's o.k , I really appreciate your help.

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