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    #1

    six feet four

    A robust man of six feet four
    Longman dictionary

    Waht does "six feet four" mean? Maybe some unit of measure is implied? E.g. four inches.
    Thank you.
    Last edited by Vik-Nik-Sor; 18-Apr-2014 at 14:10. Reason: inserted "is"


  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: six feet four

    It means "six feet, four inches" or 76 inches tall. That is about 2 meters.

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: six feet four

    In the UK, we generally still use the imperial system of measurement - yards, feet and inches. There are twelve inches in a foot, and three feet in a yard. I'm sure at some point in the future we will be forced to "go metric" for height and weight but, for now, if you ask most Brits their height and weight, they'll give you them in feet and inches, and stones and pounds.

    Note that we don't convert feet into yards when we're talking about our height. Even though I am 5' 5" (5 foot 5 inches), that would not be expressed as "one yard, two feet and five inches).
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #4

    Re: six feet four

    In most cases you would not hear any unit given at all. "I am five ten," I would say, meaning five feet, ten inches.

    A football player might be referred to as "6-5, 250" meaning 6 foot, 5 inches and 250 pounds.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: six feet four

    I'm sure that's true in AmE. However, in BrE, whilst we might miss out the "inches", we generally don't miss out "foot".

    I'm five foot four.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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