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    #1

    can 'overdraft' be verbalized?

    I've heard people verbalize 'overdraft' to mean their credit card account has been overdrawn by an amount of money. Is it accurate to use 'overdraft' as a verb? Can I say 'to overdraw a credit card'?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: can 'overdraft' be verbalized?

    The verb "to overdraw" does exist but I don't know anyone who uses it. We say "to go overdrawn".
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: can 'overdraft' be verbalized?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    The verb "to overdraw" does exist but I don't know anyone who uses it. We say "to go overdrawn".

    I think that must be BrE. We do use the verb "to overdraw" here in Canada.

    There is also a huge cultural divide. British banks genarally allow overdrafts. North American banks almost never do. Small overdrafts may be tolerated for brief intervals at very high service fees, but the general practice of North American banks is this: if there are not sufficient funds in the account to cover the cheque, it is bounced. And you absolutely cannot use your bank card to withdraw cash from an ATM unless you have the money in your account. The transaction is "declined."
    Last edited by probus; 19-Apr-2014 at 06:37.

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    #4

    Re: can 'overdraft' be verbalized?

    Can I say "to overdraw a credit card"?

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    #5

    Re: can 'overdraft' be verbalized?

    At least in the US, one cannot exceed the limit on a credit card. The transaction would be declined.

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    #6

    Re: can 'overdraft' be verbalized?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    We say "to go overdrawn".
    I am not a teacher.

    I don't say "to go overdrawn". I say "to be overdrawn".

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: can 'overdraft' be verbalized?

    I think that's a question of style. I would use "go" for the action but "be" for the state.

    If I make one more payment from my current account, I'm going to go overdrawn.
    I couldn't buy the shoes I wanted because I was already overdrawn.

    I agree that the situation differs between current (checking) accounts and credit card accounts. My current account has an authorised overdraft of 300. However, if I am already 300 overdrawn and I use my debit card (checking account card) to make a payment, the payment is likely to go through. I will then be more than 300 overdrawn, which will class as an unauthorised overdraft and I will incur heavy charges.
    My credit card, on the other hand, has a fixed limit of 4000. As far as I know, if I already owe 4000 and I try to make another payment on that card, it will be declined. I won't be able to use the card until I have made a payment which takes the amount owed to below 4000. I would still only be able to use the card again if it meant that the amount owing didn't exceed 4000.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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