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  1. Crowned 91's Avatar
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    #1

    stranger

    Hi, I was wondering about the difference between "stranger" as a noun (used in the plural form) and "stranger" as the comparative form of the adjective "strange". I made up a few sentences and I would like to know whether the use of these words is correct.

    Stranger as a noun

    We are strangers (We don't know each other)

    Do they feel like strangers ?

    They treat us like strangers.

    We are no strangers to rejection (We have experience of rejection)


    Stranger as the comparative form of the adjective strange

    We are stranger (We are more strange)

    We are getting stranger and stranger (We are becoming more and more strange)

    The more I talk to them, the stranger they seem to be.

    Do they feel any stranger (Do they feel more strange?)

    We are no stranger than we were a few days ago. ( We are the same as we were a few days ago)

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: stranger

    They are all fine.

  3. Roman55's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: stranger

    Quote Originally Posted by Crowned 91 View Post
    Hi, I was wondering about the difference between "stranger" as a noun (used in the plural form) and "stranger" as the comparative form of the adjective "strange".
    I am not a teacher.

    Stranger as a noun doesn't have to be in the plural.

    A tall dark stranger, a perfect stranger etc.

  4. Crowned 91's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: stranger

    "Stranger as a noun doesn't have to be in the plural.

    A tall dark stranger, a perfect stranger etc."

    What if I want to refer to more than one stranger? Souldn't I say "three tall dark strangers/ perfect strangers" for example?

    "Doesn't have to be in the plural" doesn't mean "mustn't be in the plural", right? "Stranger" as a noun could be either singular (stranger) or plural

    (strangers) depending on the situation, whereas as the comparative form of strange the form "stranger" is mandatory.
    Last edited by Crowned 91; 20-Apr-2014 at 19:07.

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    #5

    Re: stranger

    Yes.

  5. Roman55's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: stranger

    I am not a teacher.

    Yes, that would be fine.

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