Results 1 to 7 of 7
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #1

    Difference in these two words?

    Hello, I am new to this forum so I apologise if I haven't followed normal procedure

    I am wondering what the difference between the word "Deducible" and "Deductible" is?

    Thanks for any help.

  2. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,314
    #2

    Re: Difference in these two words?

    I am not a teacher.

    Both words can be found in any reputable dictionary, but I will give you a clue.

    They are both adjectives. One of them stems from the word "deduce" and the other from the word "deduct". That might point you in the right direction.

  3. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #3

    Re: Difference in these two words?

    Are they really adjectives? They sound more like verbs to me?

    And is the answer that deducible means to be able to figure out, and deductible means able to take something away from a total?

    So ....

    It would be deducible from the evidence that Mr. Phillip is guilty. (deducible in context)

    The pears are deductible from the final price of your fruit basket because you paid extra accidentally the last time you bought fruit from my market stand. (deductible in context)


    ??

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,515
    #4

    Re: Difference in these two words?

    Welcome to the forums, telf.

    Please note that a better title would have been Difference between 'deducible' and 'deductible'.

    Extract from the Posting Guidelines:

    'Thread titles should include all or part of the word/phrase being discussed.'


    Quote Originally Posted by telf14 View Post
    It would be deducible from the evidence that Mr. Phillip is guilty.
    The pears are deductible from the final price of your fruit basket because you paid extra accidentally the last time you bought fruit from my market stand.
    EDIT: Roman's answer below is better than mine.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 21-Apr-2014 at 18:38.

  4. Roman55's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • France

    • Join Date: Feb 2014
    • Posts: 2,314
    #5

    Re: Difference in these two words?

    I am not a teacher.

    I deducible, you deducible, he deducibles. Are you sure? I don't think they're verbs.

    You can't deduct the pears themselves from the final price of anything. The cost of the pears can be deducted/is deductible...

    You're on the right lines with your answers, though.

  5. Newbie
    Student or Learner
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Apr 2014
    • Posts: 3
    #6

    Re: Difference in these two words?

    thanks for the help guys

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England

    • Join Date: Jun 2010
    • Posts: 24,515
    #7

    Re: Difference in these two words?

    Quote Originally Posted by telf14 View Post
    Thanks for the help, guys.
    Please use correct capitalisation and punctuation in every post rather than put somebody to the trouble of correcting them.

    Students and learners of other nationalities expect native English speakers to be able to write their own language properly.

    In fact, whilst your appreciation is welcome, there is no need to write a new post to say Thank you. Simply click the Thank button on any posts you find helpful. It means that we don't have to open the thread again to read your new post and then find that it doesn't include any new information or an additional question.

    It saves everybody's time.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Difference between the words onshore and on site - Out sourcing words
    By mohan5k in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Dec-2012, 16:34
  2. [Vocabulary] Difference among the words-2
    By discipulus in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 24-Jul-2012, 13:43
  3. [Vocabulary] What is the difference between these words-1
    By discipulus in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 24-Jul-2012, 13:34
  4. [Vocabulary] Difference between two words
    By nenes in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 10-Jun-2010, 20:12
  5. Difference in words
    By Mahi in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 14-Sep-2007, 00:02

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •