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    #1

    to write a novel just to make money

    Are these both correct:

    1-He could write an artistic novel, but he wrote a novel just to make money.


    2-He could write an artistic novel, but he wrote a novel just in order to make money.


    I think they both work. My problem is that what comes after 'a novel' seems to define it to some extent. We realize that he wrote a commercial novel. In the first sentence I can't tell if 'just to make money' is postmodifying 'a novel' or is a sentence adverbial. In the second one 'in order to make money' is clearly adverbial, but the sentence seems to work.

    Gratefully,
    Navi.

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to write a novel just to make money

    "Just in order to" is really awkward. I would never write that. In fact, it's difficult to find examples of when "in order to" is better than "to."

    The phrase clearly applies to why he wrote the novel. I don't see how it could modify "novel" instead if the writing of the novel.
    Last edited by Barb_D; 26-Apr-2014 at 12:54. Reason: Typo corrected
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  2. Boris Tatarenko's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to write a novel just to make money

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    "Just in order to" is really awkward. I would never write that. In fact, it's difficult to find examples of when "in order to" it better than "to."

    The phrase clearly applies to why he wrote the novel. I don't see how it could modify "novel" instead if the writing of the novel.
    It was a typo I think.
    Please, correct all my mistakes. I should know English perfectly and if you show me my mistakes I will achieve my dream a little bit faster. A lot of thanks.

    Not a teacher nor a native speaker.

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    #4

    Re: to write a novel just to make money

    As the book has been written I would say that he could have written an artistic novel. How about literary instead of artistic?

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