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    #1

    associated with

    1. Cigarette smoking is associated with an increased risk of lung cancer.

    2. An increased risk of lung cancer is associated with cigarette smoking.

    Are both of the above sentences correct?
    I mean, can I put the cause (cigarette smoking, in this case) before or after the result (an increased risk of lung cancer, in this case)?

  1. probus's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: associated with

    Both are perfect.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: associated with

    Quote Originally Posted by herbivorie View Post
    I mean, can I put the cause (cigarette smoking, in this case) before or after the result (an increased risk of lung cancer, in this case)?
    In many case you have to because, as we know, correlation does not prove causation. So most sentences like that are best written as "X is associated/positively correlated with Y". Even when the causal direction has been discovered, it's still correct.

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