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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    horse-drawn wagons

    I think the difference between 1 and 2 is that in 1, a horse draws wagons while in 2, wagons draw a horse, and rule 2 can be applied to "time-consuming job" as well. Are these two forms universal for any same forms?

    1.horse-drawn wagons
    2.horse-drawing wagons
    At that time, children were being transported to school in all sorts of vehicles, including trucks and horse-drawn wagons. Cyr's conference attracted transpo

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: horse-drawn wagons

    I have never heard of "horse-drawing wagons". There were a couple of hits on Google with that phrase, but they were from the late 19th/early twentieth century.

  3. keannu's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: horse-drawn wagons

    If it's used, doesn't it mean this? I know it doesn't make sense, but I'd like to know the general rule.
    ---wagons draw a horse

  4. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: horse-drawn wagons

    When it was used, it did not mean that.

  5. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: horse-drawn wagons

    "A time-consuming job" is a job which consumes a lot of time. Using the same logic, "A horse-drawing carriage" would be a "carriage which draws (pulls) a horse". That makes no sense at all.

    If you insisted on using the same construction as the "job" example, it would be a "carriage-drawing horse". However, that term is not used and it never has been. You can't transfer a construction used in one set phrase to another random set of words.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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