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    #1

    to office

    I just found out that "office" can be used as a verb.Do you often use the verb "to office"? If so, how would I use it in context?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to office

    I have never heard it used as a verb and I have certainly never used it that way. In fact, I had to check a dictionary to see what the definition was.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #3

    Re: to office

    This is a new use of a noun as a verb and it annoys me to no end. "I have an office in New York" not "I office in New York."

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to office

    I've never heard this. For which I am thankful.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #5

    Re: to office

    I don't think I've heard it firsthand more than once, but I have heard people complain about it.

  3. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: to office

    The dictionary definition I found gave the example sentence "They are officed in New Orleans". I still don't like it but I can see how it has come to pass. If we consider the term "quarters", meaning "living accommodation" (particularly in military terminology), I am willing to bet that none of us has a problem with "I was quartered in Aden during the Second World War" (or similar). If we can convert "quarters" to "to quarter" or, rather, "to be quartered", then it is understandable that "office" could be converted to "to office" or "to be officed".

    Bear in mind that I am still not a fan of this usage, have never heard it used and don't plan to ever use it myself but I can see how it might have come about.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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