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      • South Korea
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    #1

    have regard, have a regard

    Hi, everyone!

    I saw these two sentences.

    Burt had high regard for his old law professor, Dr. Finch. (from Longman Dictionary)
    The students have a high regard for their teacher. (from Webster Dictionary)

    I wonder if there is any difference between 'high regard' and 'a high regard'.
    Does the latter mean a kind of high regard or anything else?

    Thanks!

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: have regard, have a regard

    They have the same meaning.

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