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  1. salvador.dal1950's Avatar
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    #1

    Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    Why is that some people, especially in Britain, pronounce the names of the days in a non-standard way?

    For example, some people say /ˈθɜː(r)zdɪ/ instead of /ˈθɜː(r)zdeɪ/, or /ˈsʌndɪ/ instead of /ˈsʌndeɪ/.

    Is it common, uneducated, childlike-sounding, etc ?

    Big thanks

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    #2

    Re: Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    I do not believe that the pronunciations you outlined is for standard BrE. See the following links for a side by side U.K. and U.S. pronunciations of Thursday and Saturday:

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...ay?q=Thursday#

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...nday?q=Sunday#

    Percy
    Last edited by PHenry1026; 01-Jun-2014 at 02:05.

  2. salvador.dal1950's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by PHenry1026 View Post
    I do not believe that the pronunciations you outlined is for standard BrE. See the following links for a side by side U.K. and U.S. pronunciations of Thursday and Saturday:

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...ay?q=Thursday#

    http://dictionary.cambridge.org/dict...nday?q=Sunday#

    Percy
    mmm I'm pretty sure they are standard British pronunciations, I've taken them from the Macmillan Dictionary.

    http://www.macmillandictionary.com/d...itish/Thursday

    Maybe the "r" in parenthesis is distracting, it just means that is optional in case you accent has rhoticity.
    Last edited by salvador.dal1950; 01-May-2014 at 18:31. Reason: misspelling

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    #4

    Re: Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    The r in the parenthesis means that it necessary in American English (AmE) but is not necessary or used in British English (BrE).


    I am not sure but your McMillan link seems to confirm the Cambridge Dictionary.

    Percy
    Last edited by PHenry1026; 01-Jun-2014 at 02:05.

  3. salvador.dal1950's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    What I mean is that some people seem not to use the standard way, they say "thursdi" and no "thurday".

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by salvador.dal1950 View Post
    What I mean is that some people seem not to use the standard way, they say "thursdi" and no "thurday".
    It's common also in AusE. /mʌndi/, /tju:zdi/ etc. or halfway between standard and that variety.
    Why do they do it? Quién sabe? In AusE, it would be described as part of a 'broad' accent which is associated with working class people and farmers, etc. But some educated people say it quick speech as well.

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    #7

    Re: Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    Hello salvador.dal1950,

    The following is a quotation from “Longman Pronunciation Dictionary” by John Wells.

    -day /deɪ, di/
    Although Received Pronunciation and General American are both traditionally considered to prefer /di/, most speakers in practice use both pronunciations for this suffix, often in a strong form—weak form relationship. The /deɪ/ form is generally preferred in exposed positions, for example at the end of a sentence: I’ll do it on Monday /ˈmʌn deɪ/ ; the /di/ form is preferred in close-knit expressions such as Monday morning /ˌmʌnd i ˈmɔː(r)n ɪŋ/.


    Hope this helps

  5. salvador.dal1950's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    Quote Originally Posted by N Senbei View Post
    Hello salvador.dal1950,

    The following is a quotation from “Longman Pronunciation Dictionary” by John Wells.

    -day /deɪ, di/
    Although Received Pronunciation and General American are both traditionally considered to prefer /di/, most speakers in practice use both pronunciations for this suffix, often in a strong form—weak form relationship. The /deɪ/ form is generally preferred in exposed positions, for example at the end of a sentence: I’ll do it on Monday /ˈmʌn deɪ/ ; the /di/ form is preferred in close-knit expressions such as Monday morning /ˌmʌnd i ˈmɔː(r)n ɪŋ/.


    Hope this helps
    Wow this is spot on! Many thanks!

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    #9

    Re: Pronouncing the names of the days in Britain

    The /deɪ/ form is also found more in some regions in BrE- I am from the Midlands, and /deɪ/ is used at times where many would use /di/.

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