Results 1 to 3 of 3
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
      • Home Country:
      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: May 2014
    • Posts: 1
    #1

    asked questions of me about..VS asked questions about..of me

    I'm a teacher teaching English in Korea.
    One of my colleges said,
    the sentence "Mom asked questions about my teacher of me." is grammatically correct,
    but the sentence "Mom asked quetions of me about my teacher." is not.

    As I know of,

    When there is not a modifier, "about my teacher", which modifies the objective case questions
    the former is correct. ( Mom asked questions of me.)

    However, when there is a modifier, "about my teacher", which modifies the objective case questions,
    the former and the latter are both correct.

    As a rule, when writing English sentences, if there is a subjective case or an objective case which has a long noun modifier,
    the modifier can be moved to the end of the sentence to make a subjective case or an objective case short; for native speakers of English
    prefer to have a short subjective or objective case in sentences.

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: asked questions of me about..VS asked questions about..of me

    To be honest, I don't like either of the sentences. "Mom asked me questions about my teacher" is much more natural.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,092
    #3

    Re: asked questions of me about..VS asked questions about..of me

    If I had to attribute grammaticality to those two sentences, I'd say they were both good. But they are not natural sentences, so it's not worth arguing the point - unless you want to tell us why your colleague thinks that sentence two is ungrammatical.

Similar Threads

  1. My daughter asked some questions of me.
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 18-Apr-2013, 07:37
  2. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 30-Sep-2012, 01:13
  3. I asked a few questions of him?
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 16-Mar-2011, 15:36
  4. [Grammar] questions from / asked by students
    By uktous in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Jan-2010, 04:14
  5. no questions asked
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 26-Apr-2008, 11:34

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •