Results 1 to 5 of 5
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #1

    quarterback

    Could I use the verb "to quarterback" as in "Country A is quarterbacking a separatist movement in country B."?

  1. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #2

    Re: quarterback

    Yes, but it is slang. People not familiar with the use of "quarterback" in sports may not understand.

    It fits one of the definitions here: http://www.thefreedictionary.com/quarterback

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Ukrainian
      • Home Country:
      • Ukraine
      • Current Location:
      • Ukraine

    • Join Date: Sep 2010
    • Posts: 3,469
    #3

    Re: quarterback

    I just needed to know if I could use it to convey a negative connotation.

  2. MikeNewYork's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 24,983
    #4

    Re: quarterback

    I don't think the word "quarterback" carries a negative connotation.

  3. BobK's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK

    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 16,038
    #5

    Re: quarterback

    It's not just slang, it's very specific to Am English. There's no-one quite (at all) like a quarterback in any English* sport. American football is watched on satellite TV (and even played) by a growing minority in Britain, but in BE, even to someone who knows about gridiron, "quarterback" isn't a verb.

    b

    * That's not an Anglocentric slip. There are sports played in Scotland and Ireland (even in Wales, maybe) that I don't know about.
    Last edited by BobK; 09-May-2014 at 11:17.

Similar Threads

  1. The coach and the quarterback each want to win the championship.
    By Katherine99 in forum Analysing and Diagramming Sentences
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 06-Dec-2012, 05:04
  2. Monday-morning quarterback
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 26-Jul-2012, 07:30
  3. sacking the quarterback
    By wwvusa in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 25-Dec-2011, 05:51
  4. Replies: 1
    Last Post: 20-Aug-2011, 21:14
  5. All-american quarterback
    By ccarmo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 30-Jul-2008, 17:08

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •