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  1. vaibhavmaskar
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    #1

    young than were unparasitised crows

    Dr Canestrari, however, decided to look a little deeper. She suspected that though their fledged clutches were smaller, crows with cuckoos in the nest were more likely to fledge "at least some young than were unparasitised crows." That might be enough to compensate for the lower number of fledglings per nest.

    "at.. to ...crows" what does the writer want to say here?

    http://www.economist.com/news/scienc...-paying-guests (source)

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: young than were unparasitised crows

    It means that crows with cuckoos in their nest were more likely than unparasitised crows (crows without cuckoos in their nest) to fledge (at least) some young.
    Probability of crows with cuckoos fledging some young > Probability of unparasitised crows fledging some young.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: young than were unparasitised crows

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    It means that crows with cuckoos in their nest were more likely than unparasitised crows (crows without cuckoos in their nest) to fledge (at least) some young.
    Probability of crows with cuckoos fledging some young > Probability of unparasitised crows fledging some young.
    It's an interesting evolutionary comment. The cuckoos manage to get away with their banditry because they manage to benefit at least some crows. A quid pro quo in which the cuckoos win on average.

  4. vaibhavmaskar
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    #4

    Re: young than were unparasitised crows

    That might be enough to compensate for "the lower number of fledglings per nest."

    What does the writer want to conclud?

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: young than were unparasitised crows

    Quote Originally Posted by vaibhavmaskar View Post
    What does the writer want to conclud?
    I don't know. I'd have to read the article. Your link goes to the front page of The Economist. I can't find the article.

  6. vaibhavmaskar
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    #6

    Re: young than were unparasitised crows

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I don't know. I'd have to read the article. Your link goes to the front page of The Economist. I can't find the article.
    http://www.economist.com/news/scienc...-paying-guests

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