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  1. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #1

    strict vs. rigorous

    Hi,

    Is "strict" synymous with "rigorous"? Can I replace "strict" with "rigorous" in the following context?

    Feynman's simple but clever experiments allowed him, in a rigorous fashion, to satisfy his curiosity about ant behavior.
    Thank you!

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: strict vs. rigorous

    Yes, although strict usually means narrow and limited, whereas rigorous actually means logically consistent and therefore water-tight or reliable.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: strict vs. rigorous

    Perhaps in this context they are similar but they are not synonyms. A teacher may have a strict rule about not allowing anyone to enter the class after the start time, but that's hardly a rigorous requirement.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  4. thedaffodils's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: strict vs. rigorous

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    that's hardly a rigorous requirement.
    Is that because it is not logically consistant as Konungursvia indicates?

    Thank you!

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: strict vs. rigorous

    You must draw your own conclusions about the two answers.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  6. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: strict vs. rigorous

    Rigorous is normally used to describe a theory or body of scientific work. It means there are no errors or inconsistencies. Strict comes from a word meaning narrow or tight, and is more often than not used when normative rules such as morals are in question.

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